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Microfilm from Ontario Archives - Index to the McNab Township Papers

https://search.adarchives.org/en/permalink/archivaldescr2023
Date
1828-1870
Collection/Fonds
Reference Material
Description Level
Item
Date
1828-1870
Format
textual records
Collection/Fonds
Reference Material
Description Level
Item
Series
9
Original Location
Ontario Archives
Creator
Neil Stewart
History / Biography
The Archives purchased the McNab Township Papers (MS 658 Reels 264, 265, and 266). Neil Stewart, a volunteer, reviewed the microfilm and created an index in 2008. The microfilm is available for viewing.
Scope and Content
The index is by lot and concession and provides type of document, date from whom and to whom. The actual documents are on the microfilm.
Notes
The index is completed but is being reviewed and introductory pages created.
Accession No.
9999-9999
Less detail
Date
January 13, 1833
Collection/Fonds
Reference Material
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
Digital File, textual record
Date
January 13, 1833
Format
textual records
Collection/Fonds
Reference Material
Description Level
Item
Series
8
Physical Description
Digital File, textual record
History / Biography
The letter was originally published in “Chamber’s Edinburgh Journal” in the year 1833. An undated Arnprior newspaper reprinted the article, saying thanks to James Macdiarmid of Arnprior for loaning his volume of “Chamber’s Journal.” The Arnprior clipping is in a scrapbook at the Champlain Trail Museum Archives in Pembroke. The article was transcribed by a volunteer at the Museum and emailed to this Archives. The letter is most likely written by Andrew Russell of McNab Township to his mother. G___ Brule in the letter is probably Greig Brule. If so, pages 133 and 310 of Peter Hessel's McNab the Township, provides the name as Andrew Russell and gives some biography. He and his wife,Isabella, with three children, left Scotland in May 1832 and arrived in McNab Township in October 1832. The location of the farm would be L14 C12, west of present Braeside.
Scope and Content
The following letter gives recounts the trip from Leith to Quebec City and to McNab Township. It provides a detailed description of the trials which the early settlers endured. Other items include the 1831 fire, mills, and lumbering. Andrew likes the Laird McNab and enjoys visiting him.
Interesting Letter by One of the Early Settlers of McNab.
[This is transcribed from a clipping, found in a scrapbook at the Champlain Trail Museum Archives, from an undated Arnprior newspaper]
A Description of the Township in 1833
The following letter, written by one of the pioneers of McNab township and published in “Chamber’s Edinburgh Journal” in the year 1833, will be found interesting reading to many of our subscribers, as it gives a graphic description of the trials which the early settlers endured during the regime of the “Old Chief.” We are indebted to James Macdiarmid, Esq., of this village, for the loan of the volume of “Chamber’s Journal” from which we make the extract:--
G----Brule, Township of McNab, Upper Canada, Jan. 13, 1833.
MY DEAR MOTHER—You’ll no doubt have passed many an anxious hour about us since we left you, and I am sure it will afford you the greatest pleasure and consolation to hear that we are all in the very best of health, and in all likelihood, in a short time, to have in this country every comfort we could desire.
I might have written to you sooner, but could not have done it so satisfactorily, for it is little more than a month since we were finally on our own land, and in our own house. We had about eight weeks passage from Leith to Quebec; but, upon the whole, as comfortable a one as we could expect in so crowded a vessel. We left Quebec, the same day we arrived, by the steamer for Montreal, where we remained five days, waiting the sailing of the track boats through the Lachine Canal. Mr. S.---, to whom, you know, I had a letter of introduction, received me very kindly, and offered me the grant of 100 ares of land, in the lower province, free, if I chose to remain; or, if I had preferred going to Niagara, he would recommend me to the situation of a book-keeper to a gentleman from that place, who was then at Montreal.
We had steam navigation to Bytown, a distance of 120 miles from Montreal, and then, partly by land, but mostly by canoes, a farther distance of 50 miles, to this township, where we arrived in the middle of August.
I met with a warm and hospitable reception from M’Nab. We remained with him until I fixed upon a lot of land, where there was a small clearance, and a house; but we had not been on this lot more than a month, when the former occupier made his appearance, and claimed the lot as his. He had verbally given it up, but as he held the location ticket, we were obliged to leave it, and accepted the invitation of our then next neighbor to remain with him until we fixed upon another lot. This person was then in the midst of his harvest, and we gave him what assistance we could, and were thus gaining a little knowledge of the customs of the country, and, at the same time, becoming better acquainted with the nature of the land. I was cautious in fixing upon another lot, and went through the greater part of the township before I did so. I at last selected the one upon which I am now sitting. This lot is what is here called a Brule, a French term, but completely adopted here, meaning a place that has been burnt. A Brule is the wildest place of the forest. I have retained the name, and, in compliment to my mother, have prefixed her maiden name. It is customary for the settlers to give their lot a name, and it behoved me to do the same.
It frequently happens that fires arise in the woods in this country; and seven years ago, six miles long by three broad, of this township, was under fire, which has consumed a good deal of the timber; but the most of it is only killed, and in the course of a few years, a great part of the hardwood is thrown down, and the underbrush springing up. My Brule formed part of this burning, and last autumn, I mean the autumn of 1831, it was again under fire, so that now there is scarce a living tree upon the lot, and a deal of the timber consumed, and in many places of the rear there is scarcely a stump left; and I may have 20 or 30 acres under crop next spring, if I can procure a yoke of oxen and seed.
The soil is a red clayey loam, lying mostly upon limestone, but partly upon a yellowish clay. The rear of the lot is a succession of gentle swelling banks, running across the lot till they terminate near the river Dochart, about 100 or 150 acres lower, where the land becomes a strong bluish marly clay. The land falls in the same manner again towards the Grand River; and as the neighbouring lots suffered also in the burnings, and my house being placed in the rear of the lot, I can see from it nearly a mile around me in all directions.
I have hitherto spoken only of the lot I hold free; but upon settling on land here, two things are to be particularly considered, that is firewood and water. I have plenty of excellent water on this lot. About the centre of it there is a fine running creek, that neither freezes in winter nor gets dry in summer; but I had no growing firewood, and the common estimate is that a settler should retain for that purpose from 20 to 30 acres of growing wood. In these circumstances, it became necessary to obtain this; and as the chief held the lot in the rear of the one I have been speaking of in his own hands, he agreed to let me have it on the same terms as his other settlers—that is, after three years, to pay him a barrel and a half of flour per 100 acres; and as there is about 140 acres of this lot adjoining the other one, also burnt in the same manner; but there is a point of it which the fire did not reach, that is within 500 yards of my house, which in a year or two I will have to resort to for firewood. The soil of this lot is somewhat like the other, and the finest part of it runs down to and overhangs the lake, commanding a fine view of the lake and of the opposite shores of Lower Canada. The lake opposite me is from one to two miles broad.
The fire of 1831 left the greater part of my free lot quite bare; but in the course of last summer there sprung up a weed called Indian kale, the same plant that is cultivated by you as a garden flower, with which it is completely covered, and interspersed with young trees, which have already attained the height of two to three feet. Accidents have never happened to any of the settlers from these fires, as they never encroach upon the clearances. Where fire had run, or where a clearance has been made, and then left in a state of nature for four or five years, as was the case with six or eight acres of the lot I settled on first, there sprung up in the greatest profusion currants, gooseberries, raspberries, strawberries, plums, and white clover, which it appears are all indigenous to this country.
I would have preferred placing my house upon the lot adjoining the lake, and close to the lake, where there is a fine flat of the finest soil covered entirely with hardwood, consisting of maple, beech, barwood, and oak, of about 50 acres in extent; but, in the meantime, I thought it more advisable to place it as nearly as possible in the midst of the greatest extent of my best and clearest land. In a few years this will become a valuable situation, as the summer after next it is expected a steamboat will ply daily from Bytown to about 20 miles above this township. We saw this vessel building when on our way up, and she was finished in time to make a few trips last year to the Chats Rapids, 10 miles below us. These rapids have been surveyed, and a canal of three or four miles will be cut next spring, to avoid them; so that, in the course of another year or two, we will have a continued chain of steam-boats from Montreal to about 20 miles above us.
This township is as yet in its infancy, although it has been settled for about 10 years. The settlers are only between fifty and sixty, and being mostly from the Highlands, and without capital or experience as farmers, they have made but little progress. Settlers in a new township have many and great difficulties to contend with at first, but the worst of these are now over here, and we may expect to make henceforth rapid improvement. Within the last two or three years, more enterprising men have settled on the township. Two or three of the old settlers who have lots on the lake, have gained money by keeping taverns, where there is a very considerable trade from the number of lumbering parties on the Grand River and the Madawaska; and among the recent settlers are two Stirlingshire men, who keep a store, and are erecting extensive saw-mills at the mouth of the latter. These mills are nearly ready to commence operations, and, when ready, they commence the erection of a flour mill, a great want here at present, the settlers having to go to the neighboring township to get their flour made.
The most of the settlers who have been here a few years are in comfortable circumstances; for the last season or two, they have been able to procure the use of a yoke of oxen, by rearing them or otherwise, and have now from ten to thirty acres under crop. In addition to the yoke of oxen, they have in general from two to six milch cows, one or two couple of young steers, two or three young cows, half a score to a score of sheep, and a few of them have a horse or two, and pigs, and plenty of the finest poultry. During six months of the year, these animals cost them nothing, but are turned into the woods, where they feed luxuriantly, each settler’s cattle generally keeping by themselves, and commonly take a circuit of three or four miles round the clearance. The only inconvenience of this is the trouble of searching for the cows to be milked twice a day, or for the oxen, when they are wanted for work. The most docile cow has a bell put round her neck, and by the sound of this, or by their track they are traced, for they have generally to be searched for, seldom coming home of themselves; and every man’s cattle are allowed to graze where they please, except where the land is fenced, and a settler fences only his cleared land. The crops cultivated here are principally wheat, Indian corn and potatoes, with a little beer, rye, oats, peas, and turnips, as well as pumpkins, which are generally grown among the Indian corn. Timothy hay is also cultivated, and brings from £.2 to £.4 per ton. Wheat fetches about 5s., Indian corn 4s., oats 2s. 6d., potatoes, 1s. 6d. per bushel; and those settlers who have any of these articles for sale find a ready market for them at these prices, principally to the lumberers, taken from their own doors.
Many of the settlers take only half a lot, that is 100 acres, and are entitled by their location ticket, as soon as they have done the settlement duties, namely, cleared 5 acres per 100, to claim a patent deed at their own expense, which cost about £.2., and this entitles them to vote for a member of Parliament. There is a general meeting of the township held annually, on the first Monday of January, when all matters relative to the internal government of the township are agreed upon, and where we elect assessors, tax-collector, town-wardens, path-masters, town-clerk, etc., and at which M’Nab votes only as an individual, and has no control over the settlers, except as a justice of the peace.
In our patent deeds, government retains the precious metals, and the white pine and oak; but the two latter they do not prohibit us from cutting, and, if they cut them, they pay us for them at the customary rates. Our taxes are small, being, I think, 3d. for a cow, 4d. for an ox, 1d. for a cleared acre, and 1s. 6d. per 100 acres of the land we hold.
In clearing land here, and getting on with operations, they have chopping bees, logging bees, raising bees, etc. A man generally chops his own timber, that is, cuts it down into such lengths as a yoke of oxen can pull, and what from four to five men can pile up—(all underbrush and small timber, such as he and his family can manage, they pile up and burn); and when this is done, he fixes upon a day, and acquaints his neighbors around him, according to the extent of the land he has to log, five men being necessary to a yoke of oxen, and these are able to do about an acre a day; so that, if he has four or five to log, he requires as many yokes of cattle and men accordingly, and on these occasions they are usually very punctual in attendance. He entertains them well at these times, having killed a sheep, or a cow, or ox, or perhaps pork or venison, with always tea or grog. At a raising, again, they muster in the same manner, about a dozen of men being necessary to put up a house, with a yoke or two of oxen, to drive in the timber, after it is cut and ready. The person we resided with, and one of his sons, assisted me in cutting the timber for my house, which occupied us for about a week; and when this was done, I acquainted my nearest neighbors of the day I had fixed on to get it put up, the whole of whom attended, to the number of thirteen, and put it up the same day.
A log house makes a very comfortable dwelling, being even warmer than a stone-house, when properly finished. Mine is built of white pine, and covered with barwood and ash scoops, and is 30 feet by 18 over the walls. The trees selected for a house are generally about a foot in diameter, and as the trees, from their growing thickly together, are straight, and without branches to within a short way of their top, you can get a cut of 30 feet off such a tree of nearly the same diameter at both ends, and these they very neatly dovetail at the corners, which makes a very strong building which lasts a great many years. A number of newly erected houses are covered with shingles, that is, the wood of the white pine cut exactly like the slates on your house, and look as well and are very durable. For this sort of assistance on the part of your neighbors, you just pay them back in the same way, by assisting them when they call upon you. I have been at several of these bees, and a great deal of work is generally got through with.
At the loggings, I was much struck with the docility and great usefulness of the oxen, which are generally yoked in pairs, and will scramble through among logs with a very heavy draught, with the greatest ease and patience, where you could scarce believe they could escape without broken legs, and where horses would be useless, and are equally, if not more, obedient to the call of their driver than the horse. They are equally useful in the sleigh, the plough, and the harrow. In the lower province they yoke them by the horns, but here they place the yoke over the back part of the neck and front of the shoulder. A yoke of good oxen, six years old, when they become fit for the work cost about £20. Bye the bye, the horses of this country astonish me. I saw some in Montreal equal to any I have ever seen in my life; even the carters about the wharfs drive horses that your gentlemen would be proud to see in their carriages.
The Grand River at this season is a most interesting scene. It is while the river is frozen that the principal part of the traffic between the different parts of the country takes place, and the sleighs are seen moving in all directions on the ice; those drawn by horses always at a trot and frequently at a gallop, even with a load; one of the horses having a string of small bells around his neck to announce their approach. This is the season, too when our land roads are best, and land travelling is now also excellent. The climate of this country is not so terrific as is frequently supposed by you; we have, no doubt, very keen frost, perhaps keener than with you, and it is more constant and continued; but we have also fine thaws when the weather if mild and pleasant; and even during our keenest frosts, we have through the day generally fine clear sunshine, the sun being much more powerful at this season here than with you; and our day is about two hours longer in winter, and two hours shorter in summer, than yours; and it is principally in the night that the severity of the frost is felt. This is generally our severest month, and some of the folks here say, that during seven years, they have not seen such severe frost as we have had lately; yet, on these days, I went about what I had to do out of doors as usual, and have never put on any additional dress to that I wore at home, except deer-skin gloves, with woolen ones under them, for my hands, with moccasins, and a couple of pairs of stockings, for my feet.
But you will, no doubt, think it is a dreadful thing to live in this thinly-peopled country, and so far from neighbours! I thought so, too, before I experienced it, but now, I assure you, I find myself more at ease than ever I felt in a town, and we are scarce ever a day without seeing some of our neighbours, or without invitations to go to see some of them; but these we seldom accept, having always so much to do at home; and we are always welcome guests at the chief’s (he is always called the Chief, or M’Nab—to call him Mr. M’Nab would be thought highly derogatory), and I am never down that way but I am invited to dine with him. Indeed, there is a spirit of hospitality here which is quite unknown at home, and in travelling through the country there is scarce a house you enter where you are not invited to partake of their bed and board, without money and without price. We have just now invitations from two of the settlers that I formerly alluded to, who are storekeepers, one of whom is also an extensive lumber-merchant, and who at first worked as a lumberer himself—from the one, to a ball he is to give in a few days; and from the other, to take a drive in his sleigh on the river, and to visit some of the settlers on the opposite shore.
The wild animals of this part of the country are the bear, the wolf, the fox, the marten, the minx, the skunk, the musk-rat, the porcupine, and squirrel. The first of these seldom or never acts but on the defensive; the wolves are seldom seen, but sometimes heard at night, and rarely molest any of our domestic animals, as the woods are swarming with deer, upon which they principally prey. The lesser animals I have named now and then carry off the poultry; but the most of the settlers allow them to roost in the open places and breed in the fields, and they are of course quite exposed to attack. The chief told me that, in one season, he had seventy turkeys carried off, and he at length discovered that the culprit was a huge old wolf, that sheltered himself a little way from his house. He watched him one night, and put two balls through him. He pointed out to me where these were lodged in the wall of his house after passing through the body of the animal, and even after this it took several dogs to kill him.
Deer are so numerous that you seldom pass through the woods without seeing them, except at this time of the year, when the cold forces them into the swamps for shelter. Some of the settlers have killed from twenty to thirty of these animals this season. Their flesh is, I am told, much superior to that of the deer in Scotland. I never tasted venison at home , but here I think I never tasted anything finer, being as fat and juicy as veal or mutton. We have hares, which at this season become white, but only about half the size of yours; one of these I shot a few days ago, which weighed about 4 lbs., and made excellent soup. We have also partridges, nearly approaching in size to your pheasants, of which a great many are killed. When you come upon them, they generally take to the tree, and are easily shot.
We can pass through the woods here at all times with perfect safety; and the settlers think no more of passing from one part of the township to the other in the night than they do in the day; and boys of six or seven will go in search of their cows for a good many miles round their clearance, where they are acquainted, without the least danger; the greatest hazard is in going into a part of the wood where one is not well acquainted, especially if the sun is not seen, for then you are just as apt to go in the wrong as in the right direction.
The whole surface of the land here is covered with wood, except the meadows formed by the beavers. These are, in extent, from a few acres up to 50 or more, and are spread here and there throughout the whole township, and furnish the settlers with excellent winter feeding for their stock. Some of these meadows are as lovely spots as I ever saw, their margins being generally fringed with the beautiful dark green foliage of the evergreen, balm of gilead, and the spruce fir, whose tops tower above the surrounding wood. The beavers are now entirely extirpated, the Indians considering them as their peculiar property, and always destroy the whole of them so soon as a township is surveyed. These meadows are every year losing their beauty, as the dams and canals of the beavers are being choked up with alder willows and other plants; but many of the stumps of the trees, cut down by these wonderful creatures to form their dams and embankments, are still to be seen; and it is worthy of remark, that in chopping down a tree we exactly follow their mode of doing it.
I subjoin a rough draught of the township, from which you will be able to form a pretty correct idea of our situation. I have not put into it a river called the Lochy, and have laid down only so much of the Dochart as shows how it affects me. This stream is something like the Westburn, or perhaps a little larger, and at some time after may be turned to account as a mill power. Between each concession there is a road of 66 feet in breadth, and the same between every fifth lot. These roads are not yet cut, but each settler is bound to clear the half opposite his own lot. The township is laid down in 200 acre lots, and contains nearly 80,000 acres.
The sowing season commences about the middle of May; and those settlers who have not oxen of their own, and cannot obtain the use of them, just hoe and rake in their seeds in a very tedious and insufficient manner. Seeds are continued to be put in till the end of June and beginning of July, potatoes being the last and by this time the full crops of wheat and rye are becoming ready for the sickle. On our best land we will sometimes have a return of 30 bushels of wheat for each bushel sown, but generally not more than 20. Farm servants get from £24 to £30 a year, and their board. Women get £12. Sheep are a very profitable stock, and thrive well. Wool sells readily at 2s. 6d. per stone. My land, from its lying high and dry, is well adapted for this sort of stock; and I may have, in two or three years , 40 to 50 acres in grass, besides 20 or 30 for other crops, having at least this much land upon which there is not a living tree; and although, in many parts of this land, dead stumps and withered trees are standing, these would be no impediment to harrowing in the timothy and white clover, which would cut for hay, or be made pasture, as might be thought expedient; but if I am not able to overtake this, the land will of course again become every year wilder.
This is a very healthy part of Canada, sickness of any kind being very rare; and fever and ague, which are very common over about the great lakes are here quite unknown. But we have neither church nor school in this township; many of the young people are growing up without even learning to read; and, in return for the attention and kindness which have been shown to us by our neighbours, I have undertaken to give their children lessons in reading and writing, during an hour of the day, along with my own. I have about a dozen sometimes in attendance; and although some of them have nearly two miles to walk, they are seldom a day absent.
We have very few mechanics here; indeed I know of none, except two smiths, who have also land; one shoemaker, and a tailor employed by the storekeepers, who receives twelve dollars a month, and board, but this man is generally half the week drunk. In my opinion no man can do wrong in coming to this country who is industrious and sober, and who is not amply remunerated for his labour at home; for it is beyond all doubt that the Canadas have as great natural advantages as the United States and are running the same race in prosperity, and greatness.
I am, etc. etc.
Barwood=basswood
Notes
The Andrew Russell Papers are at the Ontario Archives
Accession No.
9999-9999
Less detail

Renfrew County Land Records - McNab Township Land Records - McNab - Early Owners

https://search.adarchives.org/en/permalink/archivaldescr1767
Date
1825 - 1970 circa
Collection/Fonds
Reference Material
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
part of red binder
Date
1825 - 1970 circa
Format
textual records
Collection/Fonds
Reference Material
Description Level
Item
Series
6
Creator
Archives Volunteers
Physical Description
part of red binder
History / Biography
The following indexes were compiled by several volunteers under the supervision of Arnold McIntyre at the Arnprior & District Archives using Renfrew County Abstract Indexes for the Township of McNab, Sand Point and Mansfield. This project was completed over a two year period; between 2004 & 2006. As described in Peter Hessel’s book McNab - The Township, the survey for McNab township was completed in 1824 by John McNaughton, who was an apprentice of Reuben Sherwood. Many of the original settlers signed articles of agreement with the Laird in Scotland in 1825. Another group from Scotland arrived in 1830. They traveled at their own expense and settled the rear of the Township near White Lake. Researchers should refer to McNab – The Township for a detailed account of the unusual conditions the settlers faced for the first twenty years that they lived in the Township.
Scope and Content
This index is for the Township of McNab. Indices for Sand Point and Mansfield are in separate descriptons.
Occasionally, the clerk of the Land Records Office misspelled the land owner’s name; so researchers must be vigilant in searching the listing for all variable forms of names. For instance the name McLachlan may be spelled in seven different ways: McLachlan, McLochlan, McLauchlan, McLauchlin, McLaughlan and McLaughlin. Other names with variant spelling include Barry and Barrie; Heddrick and Headrick; Russet, Rosette and Rosset; McNiven, and McNeven; Havy, Hevy, Heavy and Havey; Oram, Orem and Orum; Ledgerwood and Legerwood.
Researchers interested in family history will be able to find where and when their ancestors held land in McNab Township. Moving from these lists, they can then refer to the copy books and view the original instruments which are held in the archives. Documents relating to land transactions prior to 1867 are held in the Archives of Ontario, but copies may be viewed at the Renfrew County Land Records Office (LRO) in Pembroke, Ontario.
The following index is sorted by lot and concession. An index sorted by title holders is available in Section 2 of the binder (located in Reading Room).
Concession A, B, C, D refer to Concession 12, 13, 14 & 15 respectively.
Information in the first four rows of the listing was taken from three separate McNab Township copy books held at the archives. They record original patent holder, concession, lot, and date the land was granted from the Crown.
The property owner in 1861 is listed in the fourth row. These 1861 names were printed in an early copy of the Arnprior Chronicle newspaper and are included here for comparison purposes only. In some cases, the original land owner was the same person listed as owning the land in 1861, but land was often granted to individuals who had no interest in settling on the land. For instance, the land surveyor Reuben Sherwood was granted the patent for 25 lots in the Township but did not live on any of them. In other cases, settlers occupied land for many years before the patent was granted. For instance the patent for the South West ½ of lot 1, Concession 3 wasn’t granted until 1973!
Name Concession Lot Date of Grant Owner in 1861
LINDSAY, William 1 1 Feb. 18, 1882
LINDSAY, William 1 2 Feb. 18, 1882
CAMPBELL, John 1 3 (5 acres) Dec. 12, 1872
1 4 See Bylaw 603 1965
CAMPBELL, John R. 1 E pt. 5 Mar. 27, 1939
1 6 See Bylaw 603 1965
1 E ½ 7 See Bylaw 603 1965
STEWART, John 1 W ½ 7 Jan. 23, 1880
1 8 See Bylaw 603 1965
CRANE, Edwin 1 NE ½ 9 Aug. 27, 1863
1 SW ½ 9 See Bylaw 603 1965
McLAUCHLAN, Donald 1 W ½ 10 Apr. 24, 1882
DORAN, John 1 E ½ 10 Aug. 12, 1884
DORAN, John 1 E ½ 11 Apr. 9, 1883
McLOCHLAN, Thomas A. 1 W ½, 11 Apr. 15, 1931
McLAUCHLAN, Donald 1 E pt. 12 (50 acres) Nov. 17, 1846
McLACHLAN, Thos. Alex. 1 W pt. 12 (100 acres) Mar. 5, 1919
ANDERSON, Elizabeth 1 NE ½ 13 June 13, 1851
ANDERSON, John 1 W ½ 13 June 22, 1875
AULT, John 1 14 May 4, 1838 John Fisher & Jno Muckart
FISHER, Donald 1 15 June 13, 1836 Donald Fisher
WALLACE, John 1 16 Aug. 18, 1849 John Wallace
ROCHESTER, George 1 SE ½ 17 Sept. 8, 1853 Wm. Young Rochester
LECKIE, Alexander 1 NW ½ 17 Feb. 20, 1856 Alexander Leckie
ANDERSON, Duncan 1 18 Dec. 12, 1844 David Leckie
McNIVIN, Alexander (McNEVIN?) 1 19 Aug. 25, 1845 Alex McNivin 11 & 111
McFADGEN, Colin 1 20 July 19, 1860
McGREGOR, Jane 1 E ½ 21 Sept. 12, 1845 Peter McGregor
McNEVIN, Alexander 1 W ½ 21 Aug. 14, 1872
HAMILTON, William 1 E ½ 22 Apr. 18, 1839 John McGregor
McGREGOR, John 1 W ½ 22 May 22, 1875
McNAB, John 1 E ½ 23 Dec. 26, 1888
WHITE, Archibald 1 W ½ 23 May 25, 1876
SMITH, Archibald 1 E ½ 24 Aug. 4, 1863
SMITH, Archibald 1 W ½ 24 Nov. 13, 1883
STEWART, Robert 1 NE ½ 25 June 9, 1846 Jane Stewart
CONROY, James &
McCOOK, John 1 W ½ 25 Sept. 27, 1858 Jean Stewart
MARTIN, John 1 E ½ 26 Jan. 13, 1846 William Morris
MORRIS, James Jr. 1 W ½ 26 (60 acres) Feb. 1, 1859 William Morris
HAMILTON, Catherine 1 27 Aug. 18, 1857 David Blane
WYLIE, James & William 2 1 (127 acres) Nov. 29, 1850 John Wm. Gilmour
WYLIE, James 2 2 (153 acres) Jan. 26, 1852 John Fisher
ROBERTSON, Duncan 2 3 (97 ½ acres) June 28, 1862
HEADRICK, William 2 4 (62 acres) Jan. 20, 1869
HEADRICK, William 2 4 (100 acres) Aug. 20, 1880
HEADRICK, William 2 5 (18 acres) Jan. 20, 1869
HEADRICK, William 2 5 (36 acres) Aug. 20, 1880
STIRLING, Christina 2 6 (93 acres) July 21, 1885
STIRLING, Christina 2 E ½ 7 (76 ½ acres) Jan. 16, 1885
LINDSAY, William 2 W ½ 7 (76 ½ acres) Feb. 18, 1882
2 8 See Bylaw 603 1965
MacLACHLAN, Duncan 2 NE pt. 9 ( 80 acres) Oct. 25, 1862
McINTYRE, Donald ?? 2 W ½ 10
STEWART, John 2 NE ½ 11 Mar. 17, 1866
STEWART, James 2 W pt 11 ( 75 acres) Feb. 2, 1885
McGREGOR, John 2 W ½ 12 Dec. 4, 1861
DUFF, Isett 2 E ½ 12 Dec. 4, 1861
McNAUGHTON, Donald 2 W ½ 13 Oct. 19, 1837 John McGregor
DUFF, Izett 2 NE pt. 13 June 18, 1856 Izett Duff
McNAUGHTON, Donald 2 14 Nov. 4, 1845 DonaldMcNaughton
McLAUGHLIN, Duncan 2 15 Feb. 28, 1852 Duncan McLaughlin
McLAUGHLIN, Duncan 2 W ½ 16 Dec. 24, 1850 Duncan McLaughlin
McLAUGHLIN, Duncan 2 E ½ 16 Aug. 18. 1851 John McLauchlin (50 acres)
Duncan McLaughlin
MONTGOMERIE, David 2 17 Sept. 10, 1847 William Young Rochester
STEWART, Dougald 2 18 July 12, 1847 Subdivided
CAMPBELL, John 2 19 Sept. 4, 1846 John Campbell
McNAB, Francis 2 W ½ 20 July 14, 1845 Duncan McFarlane
McNAB, Francis 2 E ½ 20 May 29, 1847 Duncan McFarlane
McGREGOR, Colin 2 S ½ 21 Mar 5, 1860 Colin McGregor
McNAB, John 2 N ½ 21 Dec. 21, 1870
McNABB, Duncan 2 22 Aug. 6, 1868
McINTYRE, Christian 2 23 Apr. 16, 1839 Christian McIntyre
McNAB, John 2 24 May 3, 1848 William Leckie
MORRIS, James 2 25 Feb. 27, 1833 James Morris Sr.
William Morris
HAMILTON, Robert Day 2 26 Jan. 26, 1856 Robert Day Hamilton
FORREST, John Sr. 2 27 Nov. 17, 1846 John Forrest
BARRY, John 3 NE ½ 1 Mar. 4, 1864
CAMPBELL, Boyd 3 SW ½ June 11, 1973
FISHER, John 3 NW ½ 2 Aug. 13, 1866
BOX, Alexander 3 SE ½ 2 May 7, 1874
HEADRICK, William 3 SW ½ 3 May 31, 1872
HEADRICK, John 3 E ½ 3 Aug. 25, 1874
FLETCHER, Robert 3 E ½ 4 May 6, 1837 Duncan McLaughlan
WYLIE, James 3 W ½ 4 May 8, 1839 John Fisher
BARBARE, Estache 3 NE pt. 5 Nov. 16, 1846 Jas. McLaughlan (50 ac) John Box (25 acres)
Eustache Barbara (25 acres)
FISHER, John 3 Pt. of W pt. 5 (26 ac.) May 14, 1856 John Fisher
CAMPBELL, John 3 Pt. of W pt. 5 (33.7 ac.) Jan. 2, 1884
McNAB, Allan 3 6 (57 acres) July 17, 1839 Subdivided
McNAB, Archibald 3 7 (37 acres) Nov. 11, 1842 Subdivided
McNAB, Allan 3 E & W pt. 8 (120 acres) July 26, 1836 Allan McNab
McNAB, Allan 3 9 July 26, 1836 Patrick O’Donnel
McLAUGHLAN, Donald 3 W ½ 10 June 22, 1973
FRASER, Donald 3 NE 1/4 10 (48 acres) Apr. 12, 1883
STEWART, Margaret 3 SE 1/4 10 Feb. 19 1885
MacLAUGHLAN, Duncan 3 11 June 11, 1855 Duncan MacLaughlan
CAMERON, Flora 3 NE ½ 12 Dec. 27, 1867
CAMERON, Archibald 3 W ½ 12 Nov. 24, 1875
McKAY, James 3 E ½ 13 Nov. 16, 1846
McKAY, James 3 W ½ 13 Oct. 18, 1856
WYLIE, James & W. G. 3 14 Nov. 29, 1850 Donald Ferguson (100 ac.)
McLAUGHLAN, John 3 15 Aug. 25, 1845 John McLaughlan
McNIE, Alexander 3 E ½ 16 May 27, 1847 Mary McNabb
McNAB, Mary 3 W ½ 16 Oct. 12, 1857 Mary McNab
HUTSON, George Stodart 3 17 Feb. 27, 1908
HUTSON, Margaret 3 18 May 21, 1855 Margaret Hutson
DICKSON, Robert 3 Front ½ 19 Jan. 26, 1852 Robert Dickson
McKIE, David 3 NE ½ 19 Sept. 19, 1860 David McKie
DICKSON, John 3 W ½ 20 Dec. 16, 1846 Michael Allen
ALLEN, Michael 3 E ½ 20 July 21, 1858 Michael Allen
ALLEN, Michael 3 W ½ 21 Nov. 28, 1859 Michael Allen
HART, Archibald 3 N ½ of E ½ 21 Jan. 13, 1876
HART, Archibald 3 S ½ of E ½ 21 Jan. 13, 1876
McNAB, Donald 3 W ½ 22 Sept. 3, 1857 Donald McNab
HART, Archibald 3 NE ½ 22 Feb. 4, 1864
HART, Archibald 3 E ½ 23 Feb. 27, 1860 Archibald Hart
HART, Archibald 3 W ½ 23 Mar. 27, 1860 Mathew Robinson
McLAREN, Malcolm 3 W ½ 24 Dec. 7, 1861
McLAREN, Malcolm 3 E ½ 24 Feb. 26, 1879
PECK, Robert 3 W ½ 25 July 15, 1847 Robert Peck
MILLER, John 3 NE ½ 25 June 18, 1859 John Miller
MORRIS, William 3 W ½ 2 6 Aug. 18, 1851 William Morris
MARTIN, James 3 E ½ 26 Apr. 28, 1885
HAMILTON, Robert D. 3 27 Dec. 18, 1858 Robert D. Hamilton
BROWN, David T. 4 E ½ 1 Sept. 4, 1857 William Ellis
McDONOUGH, Martin 4 W ½ 1 Oct. 3, 1860 Martin McDonough
STEWART, Alexander 4 2 Jan. 12, 1848 Alexander Stewart, E ½
George Brinning, SW ½
FISHER, John 4 W ½ 3 Feb. 19, 1847 John Mills
PARIS, John 4 E ½ 3 Mar. 25, 1879
McLACHLAN, Duncan 4 4 Apr. 8, 1867
HEDDRICK, James Jr. 4 W ½ 5 Oct. 20, 1845 James Heddrick Jr.
ROBERTSON, Duncan 4 E ½ 5 Jan. 8, 1856 Duncan Robertson
WYLIE, James & William 4 E ½ 6 Apr. 20, 1847 John Paris
McNAB, Allan 4 W ½ 6 July 17, 1839 Alex, Wm. & Gavin Lindsey 84 acres
McNAB, Allan 4 W ½ 7 July 17, 1839 Alex, Wm. & Gavin Lindsay
(98 acres)
CAMERON, Angus 4 E ½ 7 May 3, 1855 John Duncan McNab
HANSON, William 4 NE ½ 8 June 22, 1857 David T. Brown (50 acres)
William Hanson (50 acres)
BROWNE, David T. 4 W ½ 8 June 22, 1857 David T. Browne
FERGUSON, Peter 4 Front ½ 9 Dec. 16, 1846 John Fisher
HANSON, William 4 SE ½ of E ½ 9 June 22, 1859 William Hanson
ROBERTSON, Duncan 4 N ½ of E ½ 9 Mar. 12, 1858 Duncan Robertson
FISHER, John 4 W ½ 10 July 4, 1854 John Fisher
MacINTYRE, William 4 NE ½ 10 Mar. 4, 1864
FISHER, John 4 SW ½ 11 Sept. 3, 1862
INGLIS, David 4 NE ½ 11 July 19, 1869
CAMERON, Angus 4 E ½ of W ½ 12 June 22, 1858 Angus Cameron
BROWN, John 4 W 1/4 12 Nov. 12 1861 Lachlan Cameron
GILLESPIE, Flora 4 NE ½ 12 Mar. 27, 1860 Neil McKay
CAMERON, Angus 4 13 Nov. 17, 1846 Angus Cameron
McNAB, Archibald 4 14 May 22, 1837 Donald Cameron
SHERWOOD, Reuben 4 15 Nov. 15, 1825 John Cameron
McNAB, Mary 4 W ½ 16 Sept. 27, 1858 Mary McNab
McLACHLAN, Duncan 4 E ½ 16 Feb. 4, 1869
FISHER, John 4 SW ½ 17 Sept. 3, 1862
LAVELLE, Baptiste 4 E ½ 17 Mar. 1, 1876
BROWNE, Walter 4 E ½ 18 Feb. 9, 1858 Walter Browne
BROWNE, Walter 4 SW ½ 18 June 25, 1864
BROWN, James 4 S ½ of W ½ 19 May 1, 1873
STEWART, Robert 4 E ½ & NW 1/4 19 Apr. 29, 1873
ROBERTSON, Isabella Janet & Ann 4 NE ½ 20 Apr. 9, 1864
STEWART, Robert 4 W ½ 20 Aug. 21, 1900
ROBERTSON, John 4 E ½ 21 Sept. 3, 1861 John Robertson
ROBERTSON, John 4 W ½ 21 Aug. 14, 1884
ROBERTSON, John 4 NE ½ 22 Nov. 16, 1846 John Robertson
ROBERTSON, John 4 SW ½ 22 Aug. 13, 1884
HOLLIDAY, George 4 W ½ 23 Oct. 21, 1840 James Carmichael Jr.
HUTSON, John 4 E ½ 23 Nov. 17, 1873
MacCALLUM, John 4 E ½ 24 Feb. 27, 1833 John MacCallum
RYAN, Patrick 4 W ½ 24 Apr. 29, 1861 Patrick & Ellen Ryan
HART, Archibald 4 E ½ 25 July 16, 1861
MacKIE, James 4 SW ½ 25 Aug. 1, 1866
HART, John 4 S ½ of W ½ 26 Feb. 9, 1874
McNAB, Allan 4 N ½ of W ½ 26 Nov. 13, 1874
McDERMID, Robert 4 E ½ 26 Sept. 1, 1890
McDERMID, Robert 4 27 (100 acres) Mar. 3, 1908
BREMNER, David 5 1 July 17, 1839 Patrick Maynahan
STEWART, Alexander 5 SW ½ 2 Jan. 3, 1852 Alexander Stewart
McCONNELL, William 5 E ½ 2 Dec. 22, 1858 William McConnell Brown
SHERWOOD, Reuben 5 3 Nov. 15, 1825 Alexander Stewart
STEWART, Alexander 5 W ½ 4 Apr. 26, 1847 Alexander Stewart
STEWART, Alexander 5 E ½ 4 Oct. 25, 1852 Alexander Stewart
STEWART, Alexander 5 5 Apr. 29, 1845 Alexander Stewart
McNAB, Duncan 5 W ½ 6 Sept. 3, 1845 Duncan McNab & John McNab (50 acres each)
McNAB, John 5 NE ½ 6 Apr. 21, 1847 John McNab
McFARLANE, John 5 7 Jan. 6, 1851 Mathew Barr E ½:
John Duncan McNab, W ½
McLAUGHLIN, Thomas 5 8 Mar. 12, 1846 Thomas McLaughlin
CAMERON, Angus 5 W ½ 9 Jan. 24, 1859 John Cameron
CAMERON, Angus 5 E ½ 9 Mar. 1, 1859 John Cameron
SHERWOOD, Reuben 5 10 Nov. 15, 1825 John Cunningham
ROBERTSON, James 5 NE ½ 11 Dec. 27, 1849 James Robertson
ROBERTSON, James 5 W ½ 11 Sept. 1, 1858 James Robertson
BAIRD, John 5 NE ½ 12 Apr. 1, 1851 John Morris
MORRIS, John 5 W ½ 12 Oct. 27, 1864
SHERWOOD, Reuben 5 13 Nov. 15, 1825 John McIntyre
FERGUSON, Adam 5 W ½ 14 Aug. 31, 1837 Alexander Stewart
STEWART, Alexander 5 NE ½ 14 Mar. 9, 1864
WYLIE, James 5 SW ½ 15 Sept. 13, 1853 John Brown
McADAM, William 5 NE ½ 15 Sept. 16, 1913 William McAdam
SUTHERLAND, Jane C. 5 E ½ 16 Sept. 10, 1861
SUTHERLAND, Archibald 5 W ½ 16 Mar. 12, 1874
McINTYRE, Daniel 5 17 Jan. 10, 1867
SHERWOOD, Reuben 5 18 Nov. 15, 1825 John Miller
DICKSON, James 5 Front ½ 19 Jan. 26, 1852 James Dickson
DICKSON, James 5 NE ½ 19 June 6, 1865
ROBERTSON, Isabella, Janet & Ann 5 SW ½ 20 Apr. 9, 1864
DERENZY, Edward 5 NE ½ 20 Mar. 1, 1877
CARMICHAEL, Duncan 5 Front ½ 21 Feb. 28, 1852 Duncan Carmichael
McCALLUM, Donald 5 NE ½ 21 June, 15, 1868
HOLIDAY, James 5 W ½ 22 Apr. 4, 1839 Duncan Carmichael
CARMICHAEL, Donald 5 E ½ 22 Feb. 27, 1860 Donald Carmichael
FROUD, Thomas 5 SW ½ 23 Nov. 16, 1846 Thomas Froud
FROOD, Thomas 5 NE ½ 23 Feb. 5, 1876
CAMPBELL, Duncan 5 E ½ 24 July 13, 1852 John McDiarmid
FROOD, Thomas 5 SW ½ 24 Dec. 31, 1866
SHERWOOD, Reuben 5 25 Nov. 15, 1825 Samuel Flint
CARSWELL, Allan 5 NE ½ 26 Nov. 16, 1846 Peter McMillan
MacINTYRE, Robert 5 W ½ 26 Oct. 18, 1856 Archibald Hart
McINNES, Angus 5 W & E ½ 27 Dec. 16, 1846 Angus McInnes
McMANUS, Peter 6 W ½ 1 Oct. 29, 1847 William Fergusson
McMANUS, Terence 6 E ½ 1 Sept. 3, 1857 Terence McManus
BROWN, John 6 W ½ 2 May 27, 1852 Thomas Leckie
McMANUS, Patrick 6 E ½ 2 Sept. 3, 1857 Patrick McManus
STEWART, Alexander 6 E ½ 3 Feb. 19, 1856 James Stewart
BROWN, David T. 6 W ½ 3 July 2, 1857 David T. Brown
GREENSHIELDS, James 6 E ½ 4 Sept. 29, 1857 James Greenshields
CRAM, James 6 W ½ 4 Jan. 24, 1877
STEWART, Alexander 6 5 July 26, 1866
GREENSHIELDS, James 6 E ½ 6 Sept. 3, 1857 James Geenshields
MONETTE, Richard 6 W ½ 6 Nov. 27, 1920
BARR, John 6 W ½ 7 July 3, 1876
BENNETT, Robert 6 E ½ 7 Aug. 22, 1887
BOWES, John 6 E & W ½ 8 Sept. 4, 1847 John Bowes
ROBERTSON, James 6 E ½ 9 Feb. 10, 1858 James Robertson
ROBERTSON, James Jr. 6 N ½ of W ½ 9 Jan. 15, 1868
GRAHAM, Alexander 6 S ½ of W ½ 9 Mar. 28, 1899
ROBERTSON, James 6 10 Aug. 29, 1865
HILL, William Jr. 6 W ½ 11 June 22, 1858 William Hill Jr.
HILL, William Jr . 6 E ½ 11 Apr. 21, 1875
HILL, William 6 SW ½ 12 June 12, 1862
STEWART, Alexander 6 NE ½ 12 Jan. 12, 1850 Allan Stewart
McNAB, Alexander 6 SW ½ 13 Dec. 14, 1864
STEWART, Alexander 6 NE ½ 13 June 12, 1850 Allan Stewart
FISHER, John 6 E ½ 14 July 5, 1856 John Fisher
STEWART, John 6 W ½ 14 Apr. 25, 1900
ARNOTT, William 6 NE ½ 15 Sept. 3, 1862
ARNOTT, William 6 W ½ 15 May 13, 1874
FISHER, John 6 16 Aug. 26, 1856 John Fisher
McNAB, Duncan 6 E ½ 17 July 2, 1857 Duncan McNab
McNAB, Duncan 6 W ½ 17 Sept. 3, 1857 Duncan McNab
HAMILTON, Andrew 6 N ½ 18 Dec. 16, 1846 Andrew Hamilton
HAMILTON, Andrew 6 W ½ 18 Jan. 21, 1861 Andrew Hamilton
GREENSHIELDS, James 6 W ½ 19 Sept. 29, 1857 James Greenshields
MURPHY, Herculese 6 E ½ 19 July 21, 1858 Herculese Murphy
GREENSHIELDS, James 6 W ½ 20 Sept. 29, 1857 James Greenshields
GREENSHIELDS, James 6 E½ 20 Sept. 29, 1857 James Greenshields
CAMPBELL, James 6 E ½ 21 Jan. 21, 1861 James Campbell
NEW, Thomas 6 W ½ 21 July 11, 1873
CAMPBELL, Duncan 6 W ½ 22 Sept. 1, 1858 Duncan Campbell
CAMPBELL, James 6 E ½ 22 Jan. 21, 1861 James Campbell
McMILLAN, Peter 6 E ½ 23 Mar. 17, 1851 Peter McMillan
CAMPBELL, Duncan 6 W ½ 23 Aug. 18, 1851 Duncan Campbell
CAMPBELL, Duncan 6 SW ½ 24 Feb. 15, 1850 Duncan Campbell
McMILLAN, Peter 6 NE ½ 24 Sept. 27, 1852 Peter McMillan
McDERMID, John 6 SW ½ 25 Sept. 4, 1847 John McDermid
MILLER, James 6 NE ½ 25 July 6, 1853 James Miller
McINNES, John 6 SW ½ 26 Nov. 16, 1846 John McInnes
STEWART, Alexander 6 NE ½ 26 Feb. 18, 1847 John McInnes
McINNES, John Jr. 6 27 (100 acres) Dec. 114, 1861 John McInnes Jr.
SHIRLOCK, Patrick 7 E ½ 1 Oct. 18, 1856 John Cunningham
McMANUS, Denis 7 W ½ 1 Apr. 17, 1877
BROWNE, John 7 2 Sept. 11, 1868
BROWNE, John 7 E ½ 3 Oct. 18, 1856 John Browne
STEWART, James 7 W ½ 3 Nov. 12, 1858 James Stewart
ROBERTSON, Duncan 7 4 Feb. 19, 1856 Duncan Robertson
STEWART, Alexander 7 E ½ 5 Feb. 19, 1856 William Gemmill
GEMMELL, William Jr. 7 SW ½ 5 Mar. 23, 1858 William Gemmell Jr.
McDOUGALL, John L. 7 Rear or E ½ 6 Feb. 1, 1847 John L. McDougall
BROWNE, John T. 7 W ½ 6 May 25, 1877
BOWES, John 7 W ½ 7 Sept. 4, 1847 John Bowes
STEWART, Alexander 7 E ½ 7 July 21, 1858 Alexander Stewart
GREENSHIELDS, James 7 W ½ 8 Sept. 29, 1857 James Greenshields
EDERY, Henry 7 E ½ 8 Sept. 14, 1885
McADAM, William 7 9 Sept. 16, 1874
McINTYRE, John 7 W ½ 10 Nov. 18, 1877
McINTYRE, Jane Isabella 7 E ½ 10 Oct. 2, 1882
McLAUGHLIN, Hugh 7 W ½ 11 Nov. 20, 1858 Hugh McLaughlin
STEWART, Allan 7 NE ½ 11 May 13, 1862
STEWART, Alexander 7 SW ½ 12 Jan. 12, 1850 Alexander Stewart
MONAGHAN, John 7 E ½ 12 Nov. 14, 1861 John Monaghan
McNAB, Archibald 7 13 Feb. 27, 1833 John Campbell E ½
Allan Stewart W ½
McINTYRE, Donald 7 SW ½ 14 July 6, 1853 Donald McIntyre
McINTYRE, Daniel 7 W ½ of E ½ 14 Sept. 27 1858 Daniel McIntyre
CAMPBELL, Neil 7 E ½ of E ½ 14 Sept. 27, 1858 Neil Campbell
McGREGOR, John 7 E ½ 15 Sept. 13, 1855 Duncan McGregor
WILSON, Alexander 7 SW ½ 15 May 13, 1862
McINTYRE, Robert 7 16 Feb. 28, 1859 Alexander Stewart
CARSWELL, Thomas 7 SW ½ 17 Oct. 12, 1863
CARSWELL, Robert 7 NE ½ 17 July 24, 1866
McDOUGALL, John L. 7 Front or W ½ 18 Dec. 16, 1846 David MacKie
BROWNE, James 7 E ½ 18 Dec. 18, 1858 Charles Fyfe
LAVELLIE, Celestin 7 W ½ 19 Dec. 16, 1846 Celestin Levellie
GREENSHIELDS, James 7 E ½ 19 Sept. 29, 1857 James Greenshields
ANDERSON, Peter 7 W ½ 20 Dec. 18, 1860 Peter Anderson
McLAREN, Donald 7 NE ½ 20 May 12, 1862
McDOUGALL, John L. 7 W ½ 21 Jan. 26, 1852 William O’Conner
O’CONNOR, Charles 7 E ½ 21 July 2, 1857 John Tough
HUTSON, James 7 W ½ 22 Mar. 5, 1852 James Hutson
TOUGH, John 7 E ½ 22 May 27, 1852 John Tough
STORIE, John Jr. 7 W ½ 23 Jan. 26, 1852 John Storie Jr.
HENDERSON, Archibald 7 E ½ 23 May 30, 1859 Archibald Henderson
McMULLEN, Peter 7 W ½ 24 Apr. 1, 1854 Peter McMullen
HENDERSON, Archibald 7 E ½ 24 Aug. 30, 1854 Archibald Henderson
HENDERSON, Archibald 7 E ½ 25 Mar. 16, 1846 Archibald Henderson
MILLER, James 7 W ½ 25 May 21, 1855 James Miller
McINNIS, Angus 7 E ½ 26 Oct. 14, 1854 Angus McInnis
SIMPSON, Samuel 7 SW ½ 26 Dec. 29, 1865
McLAREN, Robert, J. R. 7 27 Aug. 18, 1851 Robert I. R. Mclaren
McGARRY, John 8 W ½ 1 Apr. 3, 1871
LEGERWOOD, Hance 8 E ½ 1 Jan. 22, 1877
LEVY, Michael 8 E ½ 2 Oct. 18, 1856 Michael Levy
STEWART, Alexander 8 W ½ 2 Feb. 9, 1858 Alexander Stewart
BROWN, David T. 8 E ½ 3 Oct. 18, 1856 David T. Brown
HEADRICK, James Jr. 8 W ½ 3 June 25, 1859 James Headrick
SMITH, James Jr. 8 NE ½ 4 June 22, 1857 James Smith Jr.
McLEAN, George 8 W ½ 4 July 21, 1858 George McLean
McNAB, Archibald 8 5 July 26, 1836 John McManigle
McLACHLIN, Daniel 8 6 June 18, 1856 Daniel McLachlin
McCREA, James Lewis 8 7 Jan. 15, 1869
ROBERTSON, Neil 8 8 Feb. 20, 1856 Daniel McLachlin
McFARLANE, John 8 W ½ 9 Sept. 10, 1856 John McFarlane
McFARLANE, John 8 SE ½ 9 Mar. 12, 1858 John McFarlane
McINTYRE, John 8 Front ½ 10 Oct. 30, 1846 John McIntyre
McINTYRE, John 8 E ½ 10 July 4, 1854 John McIntyre
ROBERTSON, Neil 8 E ½ 11 Oct. 15, 1861
ROBERTSON, Neil 8 SW ½ 11 Aug. 8, 1873
TAYLOR, John 8 12 Sept. 25, 1873
TAYLOR, Andrew 8 Pt. of W ½ 13 (90 ac.) Aug. 11, 1873
BROWNE, John T. 8 E ½ 13 May 18, 1876
GREENSHIELDS, James 8 14 Sept. 29, 1857 James Greenshields
McINTYRE, Donald 8 Front ½ 15 Jan. 26, 1852 Donald McIntyre
WALLACE, John 8 E ½ 15 Jan. 26, 1852 Duncan McLaughlan
CAMPBELL, William 8 E ½ 16 Oct. 18, 1856 John Sutherland
ROSETTE, Pierre 8 W ½ 16 June 1, 1860 Pierre Rosette ( Russett)
HUNTER, Robert 8 17 May 13, 1864
HUNTER, Robert 8 18 Sept. 17, 1863
GREENSHIELDS, James 8 19 Sept. 29, 1857 James Greenshields
GREENSHIELDS, James 8 W ½ 20 Sept. 29, 1857 James Greenshields
McLAREN, Donald 8 E ½ 20 Jan. 17, 1883
BURTON, John 8 SW ½ 21 Oct. 25, 1866
BURTON, John 8 E ½ 21 Jan. 11, 1883
ROBERTSON, Donald 8 E ½ 22 Sept. 3, 1857 Donald Robertson
ORAM, James 8 W ½ 22 Nov. 28, 1860 James Oram
ROBERTSON, Donald 8 E ½ 23 June 26, 1852 Donald Robertson
Samuel Williams (21 acres)
DERBROW, Thomas 8 SW ½ 23 Oct. 29, 1866
HENDERSON, Archibald 8 W ½ 24 July 23, 1856 Archibald Henderson
PINKERTON, Robert 8 E ½ 24 May 20, 1859 Robert Pinkerton
STORIE, John 8 E ½ 25 Aug. 18, 1851 John Storie
LINDSEY, James 8 W ½ 25 Feb. 9, 1858 James Lindsey
MacMILLAN, John 8 W pt. of W ½ 26 June 12, 1861
LOW, William 8 E pt. of W ½ 26 June 12, 1861
LOW, William 8 NE ½ 26 Apr. 1, 1867
McDOUGALL, John Lorn 8 27 Aug. 18, 1851 John McMillan
LEDGERWOOD, Hance 9 NW ½ 1 Sept. 4, 1865
LEDGERWOOD, Hance 9 S ½ 1 Mar. 1, 1890
BYRNE, John 9 SW ½ 2 Oct. 20, 1868
LEALOS, Edward 9 NE ½ 2 Feb. 4, 1867
STUBBS, John 9 3 July 26, 1859 John Stubbs
COCHRANE, Andrew 9 4 June 22, 1858 Andrew Cochrane
GREENSHIELDS, James 9 E ½ 5 Sept. 29, 1857 James Greenshields
GOODFELLOW, William 9 W ½ 5 Mar. 2, 1869
McLACHLIN, Hugh 9 6 Feb. 20, 1856 Hugh McLachlin
McLACHLIN, John 9 7 Feb. 20, 1856 John McLachlin
HYDE, Charles 9 8 Feb. 20, 1856 McLachlin, Daniel
McLACHLIN, Daniel 9 9 Sept. 27, 1869
MacCREARY, James 9 10 Oct. 18, 1856 James Maccreary
MacCREARY, James 9 11 Oct. 18, 1856 James Macreary
McCREERY, James 9 W ½ 12 Sept. 3, 1857 James McCreery
BURWASH, Nathaniel 9 E ½ 12 Sept. 3, 1857 Nathaniel Burwash
SCOTT, Richard W. 9 13 Feb. 24, 1857 Richard W.Scott
SCOTT, Richard W. 9 W ½ 14 Feb. 24, 1857 Richard W.Scott
CAMPBELL, Duncan 9 E ½ 14 July 21, 1858 Duncan Campbell
BATTLE, Patrick 9 E ½ 15 Mar. 11, 1858 Hugh Lynn
DEVINE, Patrick 9 W ½ 15 Sept. 27, 1858 Patrick Devine
HUNTER, Robert 9 16 Sept. 17, 1863
McLEAN, William 9 17 Nov. 9, 1885
STEVENSON, John 9 E ½ 18 Feb. 10, 1858 John Stevenson
SPENCE, John 9 W ½ 18 Nov. 28, 1860 John Spence
SPENCE, John 9 W ½ 19 Mar. 12, 1858 John Spence
STEWART, Charles 9 E ½ 19 Dec. 18, 1858 Archibald Stewart
STEWART, Archibald 9 N ½ 20 May 19, 1851 John Stewart
STEWART, Archibald 9 S ½ 20 Mar. 4, 1859 Archibald Stewart
STEWART, Archibald 9 Rear or E ½ 21 Dec. 16, 1846 Daniel Stewart
STEVENSON, George 9 W ½ 21 Jan. 26, 1886
RADENHURST, Thomas 9 Rear or E ½ 22 Feb. 19, 1847 William Storie
STORIE, William 9 W ½ 22 Dec. 18, 1858 William Storie
RADENHURST, Thomas 9 Front or W ½ 23 Feb. 19, 1847 Samuel Williams
STORIE, John 9 E ½ 23 Oct. 18, 1856 Thomas Martyn
CHURCH, Levi Ruggles 9 E ½ 24 Apr. 27, 1872
PHILLIPS, David 9 W ½ 24 May 22, 1872
SHERWOOD, Reuben 9 25 Nov. 15, 1825 John McGregor
SHERWOOD, Reuben 9 26 Nov. 15, 1825 James Storie E ½
John Storie W ½
RADENHURST, Thomas 9 E & W ½ 27 Feb. 19, 1847 John Storie
GRAHAM, James 10 E ½ 1 Jan. 26, 1852 Peter Howard Church
SCOTT, Ingram 10 W ½ 1 Feb. 19, 1856 Ingram Scott
SHERWOOD, Reuben 10 2 Nov. 15, 1825 Samuel Flint
WATSON, William 10 E ½ 3 Aug. 26, 1856 William Watson
ELLIOTT, John 10 W ½ 3 Sept. 2, 1857 John Elliott
EADY, Edmund 10 W ½ 4 Sept. 10, 1856 Coller M. Church
WYLIE, James & Wm. 10 E ½ 4 Nov. 29, 1850 Daniel Hilleard
McLACHLIN, Daniel 10 5 Aug. 30, 1861
McLACHLIN, Daniel 10 W ½ 6 Aug. 31, 1852 Daniel McLachlin
McLACHLIN, Daniel Jr . 10 E ½ 6 Feb. 20, 1856 Daniel McLachlin Jr.
McLACHLIN, Daniel 10 7 Sept. 27, 1858 Subdivded
HAVY, James 10 W ½ 8 Oct. 18, 1856 James Havey
MACGONIGAL, William 10 E ½ 8 Oct. 18, 1856 William Macgonigal
HAVY, James 10 W ½ 9 Oct. 18, 1856 James Havey
McGONIGAL, Peter 10 E ½ 9 Mar. 17, 1873 Peter McGonigal
SCHEEL, Frederick 10 10 Dec. 31, 1867
McLAREN, Peter Stewart 10 W ½ 11 Aug. 28, 1856 Peter Stewart McLaren
McLAREN, Peter Stewart 10 E ½ 11 Oct. 18, 1856 Peter Stewart McLaren
McLAREN, Peter Stewart 10 12 Oct. 18, 1856 Peter Stewart Mclaren
SCOTT, Richard W. 10 13 Feb. 24, 1857 Richard W. Scott
ODBER, Henry 10 14 Nov. 16, 1867
CONNELL, John 10 W ½ 15 Sept. 21, 1860 John Connell
SCOTT, Henry 10 E ½ 15 Mar. 27, 1860 Henry Scott
WAIT, John Turner & 10 E ½ 16 Oct. 18, 1860 John Turner Wait &
WARD, Sherwood W. Sherwood W. Ward
DILLON, Edmund 10 SW ½ 16 Dec. 15, 1862
SUTHERLAND, Donald 10 17 Feb. 2, 1880
STEVENSON, John 10 W ½ 18 Feb. 10, 1858 John Stevenson
CONNELL, Charles 10 E ½ 18 Feb. 23, 1860 Charles Connell
STEVENSON, Donald 10 W ½ 19 Oct. 5, 1859 Donald Stevenson
CAMPBELL, Malcolm 10 E ½ 19 Oct. 5, 1859 Malcolm Campbell
STEVENSON, Alexander 10 E ½ 20 Aug. 18, 1851 Alexander Stevenson
STEVENSON, Alexander 10 W ½ 20 Aug. 26, 1856 Alexander Stevenson
STEWART, Charles 10 W ½ 21 Aug. 26, 1856 Peter McLean
STEPHENSON, James 10 E ½ 21 July 14, 1871
STEVENSON, Alexander 10 22 July 25, 1848 James Stevenson
DOWNIE, John 10 Front ½ 23 May 28, 1839 Duncan Dewer
DEWAR, Duncan 10 E ½ 23 Oct. 5, 1859 Duncan Dewar
MacLAREN, James 10 W ½ 24 Feb. 27, 1833 Donald McLaren
BAIN, Walter 10 NE ½ 24 May 3, 1862
McLAREN, James 10 W ½ 25 May 3, 1848 Donald McLaren
LAVANTURE, Louis 10 E ½ 25 Oct. 2, 1882
STORIE, William 10 SW ½ 26 July 25, 1848 Mary, Joseph, David Storie
STORIE, James 10 NE ½ 26 July 6, 1853 Robert Storie
CAMPBELL, John 10 N ½ 27 July 18, 1882
SHERWOOD, Reuben 11 1 Nov. 15, 1825 Simon Peter VanDusen
John Russell (50 acres)
CHURCH, Peter H. 11 2 Mar. 4, 1859 John Bower Lewis
SHERWOOD, Reuben 11 3 Nov. 15, 1825 Joseph Seely W ½
Edward Bishop E ½
Ellen Seely 1 acre of W 1/2
SEELY, John 11 W ½ 4 Sept. 27, 1858 Marion Seely SW ½ of W ½
Justice Seely NW ½ of W ½
KEYS, William John 11 E ½ 4 Oct. 24, 1902
BURWASH, Nathaniel 11 5 Feb. 20, 1856 George Aird pt. E ½ (62 ac)
Hugh McLachlin (137 ac.)
BROWN, James 11 E ½ 6 May 3, 1848 John McDonald
McLAUGHLIN, Hugh 11 W ½ 6 Sept. 27, 1858 Hugh McLaughlin
BROWN, James 11 E ½ 7 May 3, 1848 John McDonald
ROBERTSON, Neil 11 SW ½ 7 Jan. 12, 1862
McCORMICK, James 11 8 Aug. 31, 1852 James McCormick
McNAMARA, Dennis 11 W ½ 9 Sept. 27, 1858 Dennis McNamara
BROWNE, James 11 E ½ 9 Sept. 27, 1858 Dianah & James Brown
SHERWOOD, Reuben 11 10 Nov. 15, 1825 Samuel Flint
SHERWOOD, Reuben 11 11 Nov. 15, 1825 John Campbell
ROBERTSON, Peter 11 E ½ 12 June 26, 1852 Peter Robertson
STEWART, William 11 SW ½ 12 Nov. 12, 1863
STEWART, Robert 11 E ½ 13 Nov. 20, 1858 Robert Stewart
STEWART, Jameson 11 W ½ 13 Mar. 13, 1861
RADENHURST, Thomas M. 11 W ½ 14 July 25, 1848 Thomas M. Radenhurst
STEWART, Jamieson 11 E ½ 14 Mar. 13, 1861
CAMPBELL, Peter 11 NE ½ 15 Oct. 25, 1847 Peter Campbell
CAMPBELL, Peter 11 SW ½ 15 Sept. 1, 1864
CARMICHAEL, James 11 NE ½ 16 July 6, 1853 John Carmichael
CONNOR, Stephen 11 W ½ 16 Dec. 4, 1861
DEWAR, John 11 NE ½ 17 July 21, 1866
HARVEY, John 11 SW ½ 17 Nov. 5, 1866
SHERWOOD, Reuben 11 18 Nov. 15, 1825 David Stewart
SHERWOOD, Reuben 11 19 Nov. 15, 1825 Charles McDavit
SHERWOOD, Reuben 11 20 Nov. 15, 1825 Edward George Ellis
DEWAR, Alexander 11 W ½ 21 July 25, 1848 Alexander Dewar
DEWAR, Donald 11 E ½ 21 Feb. 4, 1878
BOYD, Margaret 11 W ½ 22 June 22, 1858 Margaret Boyd
CAMPBELL, Colin 11 E ½ 22 Nov. 16, 1880
SHERWOOD, Reuben 11 23 Nov. 15, 1825 Samuel Flint
CAMPBELL, John 11 24 May 22, 1875
ANDERSON, Duncan 11 25 Feb. 27, 1828 Michael Roddy
STORIE, James 11 SW ½ 26 Jan. 30, 1855 James Storie
STORIE, James 11 NE ½ 26 June 22, 1858 James Storie
ALLAN, James 11 27 Dec. 16, 1846 William McWhirter
SHERWOOD, Reuben A 1 Nov. 15, 1825 Dennis Barrett SW ½
John Otterson NE ½
HEVEY, Thomas (Havey ?) A SW ½ 2 Sept. 17, 1868
HEAVY, James ( Havey? ) A E ½ 2 Apr. 15, 1852 James Havey
HEAVY, James ( Havey? ) A E ½ 3 Feb. 28, 1852 John Heavy ( Havey? )
STEWART, Nancy A W ½ 3 Apr. 18, 1861 Nancy Stewart
McCREERY, James A 4 June 22, 1857 James McCreery
O’CONNOR, James Jr. A W ½ 5 Dec. 18, 1858 James O’Connor
MacDONNELL, Alexander A E ½ 5 Sept. 28, 1854 Patrick Callaghan (90 acres)
James O’Connor Jr. (10 ac.)
McNAB, Alexander A NE ½ 6 Oct. 25, 1847 James Yuill
McNIE, James A W ½ 6 Feb. 27, 1833 James McNee
Alexander McNab (14 acres)
McNIE, James A W ½ 7 Feb. 27, 1833 Duncan McNie
William Forbes (40 acres)
MOONEY, Patrick A E ½ 7 May 3, 1848 Subdivided
CAMPBELL, John A E ½ 8 May 19, 1851 John Campbell
HARVEY, John A SW 1/4 8 Apr. 17, 1866
CAMPBELL, Archibald A NE 1/4 8 Apr. 16, 1866
CAMPBELL, Malcolm A Front ½ 9 Oct. 4, 1853 Malcolm Campbell
HYDE, Charles A E ½ 9 Sept. 2, 1857 James Storie N ½ of E ½
George Hyde S ½ of E ½
RAMSEY, Daniel A NE ½ 10 Sept. 12, 1862
CAMPBELL, Malcolm A W ½ 10 June 10, 1861
ROBERTSON, James A E ½ 11 Feb. 27, 1833 James Robertson
Dugald C. McNab (4 acres)
ROBERTSON, Duncan A W ½ 11 Jan. 26, 1852 Duncan Robertson
TOUGH, John A W ½ 12 Feb. 10, 1858 Charles O’Conner
PATERSON, James A E ½ 12 Sept. 19, 1860 James Paterson
KIDD, George A 13 Feb. 20, 1856 George Kidd
CAMPBELL, Duncan A W ½ 14 Feb. 20, 1856 John Campbell
CAMPBELL, John A NE ½ 14 Sept. 2, 1864
SHERWOOD, Reuben A 15 Nov. 15, 1825 John Otterson
CAMPBELL, John A Front ½ 16 Jan. 26, 1852 John Campbell
WARNOCK, John Shirley A Rear ½ 16 June 20, 1906
CARMICHAEL, John A W ½ 17 Feb. 10, 1858 John Carmichael
MacDONALD, William J. A E ½ 17 Mar. 26, 1884
SHERWOOD, Reuben A 18 Nov. 15, 1825 Billa Flint
SHERWOOD, Reuben A 19 Nov. 15, 1825 Billa Flint
BRENNAN, John A W ½ 20 Apr. 30, 1875
PATTERSON, Catherine A E ½ 20 Mar. 24, 1877
RODDY, Michael A 21 Nov. 28, 1853 Alexander McDonell
McDONELL, Alexander A 22 Sept. 7, 1852 Hugh & John Ryan
MacKILLOP, John A 23 Dec. 15, 1856 Charles Stewart
SHERWOOD, Reuben B 1 Nov. 15, 1825 Samuel Flint
FINNERTY, Peter B W ½ 2 Mar. 9, 1855 Peter Finnerty
BROWN, Robert B E ½ 2 July 21, 1858
SHERWOOD, Reuben B NE Pt. 3 Nov. 15, 1825 James Havey
STEWART, Nancy B W Pt. 3 Oct. 5, 1860 Nancy Stewart
McGONIGLE, Hugh B Rear ½ 4 Feb. 28, 1852 McGonigal group
EADY, Edmund B W ½ 4 Nov. 3, 1852 Edmund Eady
McNAB, Francis B NE ½ 5 Nov. 6, 1851 Nathaniel Burwash
McNAB, Isabella B W ½ 5 Sept. 1, 1858 Isabella McNab,
John Butler (9 acres)
SHERWOOD, Reuben B 6 Nov. 15, 1825 Billa Flint
SHERWOOD, Reuben B 7 Nov. 15, 1825 Samuel Flint
STORIE, Robert, James, B Pt. 8 (15 ac.) July 6, 1862
Margaret, Ellen, & Christine
ROBERTSON, Neil B Pt. 8 (80 ac.) Feb. 10, 1867
McLAREN, Peter B Pt. 8 (105 ac) Feb. 5, 1862
O’CONNOR, James B E ½ 9 Feb. 10, 1858 James O’Connor
O’CONNOR, James B SW ½ 9 Nov. 2, 1864
ROBERTSON, James B E ½ 10 Feb. 27, 1853 James Robertson
BROWN, Robert B SW ½ 10 Jan. 24, 1859 James Young
ROBERTSON, Peter B 11 Aug. 14, 1846 Peter Robertson
McDONELL, Alexander B 12 July 26, 1856 Alexander McDonell
McDONELL, Alexander B 13 Dec. 3, 1859 Alexander McDonell
ORUM, Margaret B 14 Feb. 15, 1866
McDONELL, Alexander B 15 Nov. 27, 1861
McDONELL, Alexander B 16 Oct. 21, 1854 Alexander McDonell
McDONELL, Alexander B 17 Mar. 7, 1842 Alexander McDonell
McDONELL, Alexander B 18 Sept. 21, 1833 Alexander McDonell
McDONELL, Alexander B 19 Sept. 21, 1833 Alexander McDonell
RODDY, Michael B 20 July 17, 1839 Alexander McDonell
RODDY, Michael B 21 July 17, 1839 Alexander McDonell
GOODWIN, Alexander Sr. C W ½ 1 Aug. 10, 1848 David Goodwin
GOODWIN, Alexander Sr. C E ½ 1 Dec. 18, 1860 Alexander Goodwin
SHERWOOD, Reuben C 2 Nov. 15, 1825 William MacKay
McNAB, Archibald C 3 Feb. 28, 1828 Daniel McLaughlin
McNAB, Archibald C Pt. E ½ 4(12 ac.) Apr. 15, 1845 Kennell burial ground (2 ac.)
STORIE, James C Pt. E ½ 4(18 ac.) Dec. 4, 1848 Daniel McLaughlan (11 ac.)
James Storie (7acres)
McNAB, Archibald C SW ½ 4 Feb. 28, 1828 Daniel McLaughlan
McNAB, Archibald C Broken 5 Feb. 28, 1828 Daniel McLaughlan
McNAB, Duncan C 6 Feb. 27, 1833 Isabella McNab
McNABB, Duncan C 7 Feb. 27, 1833 Isabella McNabb
MALLOCH, John G. C 8 Dec. 16, 1846 Marshall Henderson
MALLOCH, John G. C 9 Dec. 16, 1846 Henry O. Burritt
BLAISDELL, Julius C. C 10 Feb. 8, 1866
McDOUGALL, John L. C 11 Dec. 28, 1860 John L. McDougall
HILLIARD, Daniel D 1 Aug. 7, 1861
ECKFORD, James D 2 July 4, 1854 James Eckford
STORIE, James D 3 Jan. 30, 1855 Daniel McLachlin
STORIE, James D 4 (11 acres) Aug. 12, 1837 Daniel McLachlin
STEWART, Andrew M. Stewart’s Island, Waba Lake (6.7 ac.) Mar. 28, 1911
BRUNTON, Stopford Island B.T. 2, Waba Lake (6.4 ac.) Nov. 16, 1911
OSTLER, Frederick Island G. T. 64 White Lake (.33 ac.) Oct. 29, 1959
DRYSDALE, Andrew Myrtle Island, White Lake (.76 ac) May 6, 1912
JONES, Howard Livingstone Jacob’s Island, White Lake (.38 ac) Jan. 30, 1915
CANADIAN PACIFIC RR. B Water lot in Ottawa River Apr. 23, 1913
in front of parts of Lots 17 & 18
Notes
Other sources of information related to land ownership in McNab are assessment and collector’s rolls (held at the Arnprior and District Archives) and the general register of wills (held at the LRO). Various branches of the South Renfrew Women’s Institute have compiled the history of farms in McNab Township for their Tweedsmuir History books. The Arnprior & District Archives holds these valuable records along with copies of private individual’s research and recollections about the history and development of the Township.
Accession No.
9999-9999
Less detail
Collection/Fonds
Reference Material
Description Level
Item
find a particular name. This index has all those names in alphabetical order in one list, which gives, for each name recorded, the section of the cemetery in which the grave is located followed by the plot number of the grave and the number of the entry in the original listing. Since those listings are
  1 document  
Format
textual records
electronic records
Collection/Fonds
Reference Material
Description Level
Item
Series
10
Creator
Archives Volunteers
History / Biography
The White Lake Community Cemetery was originally established as a Presbyterian Cemetery (later United Church) but as its name indicates it is now a Community Cemetery for all denominations. It is located in the Township of McNab/Braeside at Concession 3, Lot 10. According to the records, the first burial was of Elizabeth Hill (1791-1823). The White Lake Cemetery held the 1st decoration service in 1921 with Reverend McNaught presiding.
Custodial History
Production of this index was undertaken by the Arnprior and District Archives (later Arnprior & McNab/Braeside Archives), led by Philip N. Durett and finished, June 2000. It was based on an original index preapred by Olga Lewis and Cecil Lews in 1995, which was divided into sections and not listed alphabetically.
Scope and Content
The White Lake Cemetery amalgamated index is an alphabetical list for each name recorded in the cemetery's records and gravemarkers. In addition to the names, it includes the section of the cemetery in which the grave is located followed by the plot number of the grave and the number of the entry in the original 1995 index listing.
Notes
The document is searchable. Search Last Name First name and do not include commas in your search.
Related Material
2009-0238 White Lake Community Cemetery Committee fonds
Accession No.
9999-9999
Documents

White Lake Cemetery Index - searchable.pdf

View PDF
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Crown receipt for sale of lot 24, conc. 1, March Township

https://search.adarchives.org/en/permalink/archivaldescr5230
Date
4 October 1836
Collection/Fonds
McLachlin Bros. fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mm textual records
  1 document  
Date
4 October 1836
Format
textual records
Collection/Fonds
McLachlin Bros. fonds
Description Level
Item
Series
F209
Physical Description
1 mm textual records
Scope and Content
Detailing the agreement on the 200 acres of land being sold on Lot 24 in the First Concession in the Township of March in the Bathurst District. Memorandum of sale detailing installments due and payable.
Notes
Envelope 1
Access Restriction
Use digital copy only. Archivist's permission required to access original.
Accession No.
2003-0164
Documents

2003-0164_MU1957_1836_CorFromRSullivan.pdf

View PDF
Less detail
Date
1820-1840 c.
Collection/Fonds
Reference Material
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
hard covered book - 218 pages
Date
1820-1840 c.
Format
textual records
Collection/Fonds
Reference Material
Description Level
Item
Series
1
Creator
Dugald C. McNab
Publication
Original print 1899 in Toronto; Alexander Fraser, editor and publisher
Physical Description
hard covered book - 218 pages
Physical Condition
poor - cover not attached to book
Acquisition Source
discard from the London Public Library
Scope and Content
The book describes the difficulties between the Laird of McNab and his settlers in Canada. It details the settlers' struggle for freedom. Contents include:
The Flight
The McNab in Canada
Arrival of the Settlers
New Arrivals
A Digression
The Sheriff's Raid
Imprisonment of the McIntyres
Military Tactics of McNab
Mr. Allan's Report
The Trials
Imprisonment of Mr. Stewart
Final Triumph of the Settlers
Investigation of Grievances
The Chief's Reply
The Settlers Free
McNab and Hinck's Trial
Discomfiture of the Chief
Last Scene of All
Notes
Dugald McNab wrote the account of the difficulties between the Laird and his settlers, which appeared in several local papers and in the Scottish Canadian and obtained wide circulation. When it was requested that the information be preserved, Alexander Fraser, Archivist of Ontario at the time, created this book.
See Appendix 8 (p.313) of Hessel's McNab - The Township book
Accession No.
9999-9999
Less detail

McLachlin Bros. Material Transferred from the Archives of Ontario

https://search.adarchives.org/en/permalink/archivaldescr5226
Date
1834-1941
Collection/Fonds
McLachlin Bros. fonds
Description Level
Series
Physical Description
30 cm textual records
1 shanty accounts ledger
Date
1834-1941
Format
textual records
Collection/Fonds
McLachlin Bros. fonds
Description Level
Series
Series
F209
Physical Description
30 cm textual records
1 shanty accounts ledger
Acquisition Source
The Archives of Ontario
Scope and Content
This series contains all material transferred in 2017 from the ARCHIVES OF ONTARIO known as the Daniel McLachlin family fonds (F209). The papers were donated to the Archives of Ontario in 1961 by Mrs. Franklyn Cunningham (neice of Charles Macnamara of Arnprior). The papers in this series are largely commercial. The correspondence concerns business matters with occasional comments on affairs of the day. There are invoices, accounts, receipts, bills of lading, contracts and timber licences. The papers give detailed information concerning the operations of a large timber industry.
1. Shanty Accounts (F209-MU1958);
1890-1891;
Box H 0.21;
Ledger contains thousands of receipts, correspondence and notes related to expenses for various shanty operations including payments to employees working in the bush and supplies for each location. The paper documents have been pasted onto pages in a cascading manner (with several to each page) in chronological order from April 1890 to September 1891.NOTE: This document is fragile and can only be handled by the Archivist. Consult digitized version.
2. McLachlin Bros. Lumber Merchants Correspondence (F209-MU1957) USE DIGITAL COPIES ONLY;
1834-1941;
Box H 0.22;
15 Envelopes of correspondence arranged chronologically. Subjects/people found in the correspondence include: Arnprior, Brockville and Ottawa Railroad, Bytown, Commercial Records, Jason Gould, Grand Trunk Railway, Hudson's Bay Company, William Knowles, Lanark and Renfrew Counties, Lumber Industry, Lumbering Contracts, Daniel McLachlin, Hugh McLachlin, William McLachlin, D. C. McNab, Charles MacNamara, Madawaska River, Marble Quarries at Arnprior, Wesleyan Methodists, Saw Mill, Grist Mill, Montreal Exhibition, John Morris, Ottawa and Brockville Railway, Neil Robertson, Lumber Shanties, Henry G. Sims, Timber Contracts, Timber Licence, Professor H. W. Thompson, University of Toronto.;
Envelope containing two Xerox copies of a notebook entitled, "Record of supplies used and timber cut at lumber camps, 1897 - 1903." Donated by the Graham Family to the Archives of Ontario, Accession 9237, 10752.
3. McLachlin Bros. Lumber Co. Arnprior blueprint for alterations and additions 1920. (F209) Accession 6765 (Rolled document) Map Box 3 on top of Land Records Cabinet;
Linen-backed blueprint identified as Drawing No. 9. Designed by George H. Johnson (Engineer), Drawn by Thomas H. Bacon. Drawing shows Mill #3 and Mill #4 with conveyor belts between mills and sorting table. Other features include areas of swamp & mixed bush, gravel pit, piers, booms and tugs in the Ottawa River, railway sidings and a locomotive.
4. Material used in McLachlin Bush Operations (F209-MU1959) Accession 6765;
Tables for Reducing Saw-Log to the Various Standards in Use Showing also their Contents in Cubic Feet and Board Measure by Maxfield Sheppard published in Quebec, Printed by C. Darveau, No. 8, Mountain Hill 1863. This copy was purchased by McLachlin Bros. in April 19 1870.;
The Shanty Companion - Le Compagnon du Chantier - by J. O. Laferriere; published in 1874 (2 copies);
3 piece fold-out Miller's Cubing Cards; undated;
Madawaska Accounts of Men who are making Timber for D. McLachln for 1847-1848. Inscribed on front page: "It is the Rule for this season's business that every man is to pay two shillings and six pence per pound for the tea he may use" signed DM.
Names contained in the pocket notebook include: (names appear as written);
William Anderson;
William Batie;
N. Cameron;
D. Cameron;
J. Cowan;
George Carson;
Alex Crayton;
Charles Dawson;
E. Dorion;
A. Gourlay;
Archibald Graham;
F. Harvey;
N. Hyde;
D. Heath;
Ezedore Juonice;
Louis Lavalle;
Joseph LaRoque;
Eustau Laroque;
Hugh McDonnell;
Duncan McKinnon;
Donald McKinnon;
Antoine Nober;
Alexander Rongie;
Narcise Shorrett;
Peter Sargent;
Samuel Sargent;
Elisha Sargent;
Luke Taque;
Joc Therowe;
Thomas Wetherly;
Alexander Mackey;
Lachlin McFageon;
Duncan McDonell;
Hugh McLachlin;
Jerry Marvin;
Hugh McCutcheon;
Andrew Miller;
Charles Miller
Access Restriction
Use digital copies only of letters and shanty accounts ledger.
Related Material
See item-level records for each letter in box H 0.22
Accession No.
2004-0168
Less detail
Date
1823-1984
Collection/Fonds
Reference Material
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
hard covered book - 138 pages
Date
1823-1984
Format
textual records
Collection/Fonds
Reference Material
Description Level
Item
Series
1
Creator
Leo Lavoie
Publication
Arnprior, Ontario 1984. Sponsored and Published by The Arnprior and Distrcit Historical Society
Physical Description
hard covered book - 138 pages
History / Biography
Leo Lavoie is a local historian and author whose first love is to study and relate information about Arnprior.
Acquisition Source
Donated by the Arnprior and District Historical Society, 1993.
Scope and Content
The book is an authoritative retelling of Arnprior's past, covering the period from 1823 to 1984. It also relates many statistics and facts about the town of Arnprior. This book is an excellent reference tool to anyone interested in learning more about the town of Arnprior.
The following subject index consists mostly of names. Only photos of significant place/name entries are indexed. Index prepared by Laurie Dougherty in November-December 1995; some entries added by Peter Hessel in December 1995 and later. Also see August 24, 1983 issue of the Chronicle for interview with Lavoie about book.
[The numbers refer to pages]
Abraham, Bill, 86
Airport, South Renfrew Municipal, 88
Albertson, Captain, 83
Alerts Hockey Club [photo, 1916] 98
Arnprior 1855, (photo) 10
Arnprior & District Fish & Game Club, 90
Arnprior Bottling Works, 80
Arnprior Box Company, 66
Arnprior Cabinet Company, 66
Arnprior Centennial Celebrations, 6
Arnprior Chronicle newspaper, 42, 78
Arnprior Citizen’s Band, 83
Arnprior early history, 2-10, (photos) 96-99
Arnprior Electric Light & Power Company, 65
Arnprior Guide newspaper, 79
Arnprior Marble Factory, 66 [photo] 97. See file “Marble Factory” in Peter Hessel Fonds.
Arnprior Medical Centre, 69
Arnprior Millstock Company, 65
Arnprior Planing Mill, 65
Arnprior Post Office, (photos) cover, 106, 111, 127
Arnprior Public School, (photo)11
Arnprior Watchman newspaper, 79
Arnprior Weekly Review newspaper, 78
Atkey, R.S., 78
Aumond, Joseph, 4
Ayling & Ramage Boat Builders, 66
Badische Canada Ltd., 62
Baker Ford Agency, 66
Baker, A.J., 91
Baker, T.J., 91
Baker, William, 64
Baldwin, Sherman, 28
Band [photo, 1923] 105
Bank of Nova Scotia [photo, 1874] 100
Bank of Ottawa [photo, 1874] 100
Barnett, Vincent, 66
Baseball, 91, [photo] 109
BASF, see Badische
Bates, Esra A., 50
Baumann, Eric, 85
Beattie, William G., (photo) 85
Bell, Andrew, 82
Bell, James, 82
Berndt family, 74
Berry D. & Sons, 66
Black River, 21
Black, Theo, Butter Tub Factory [photo] 97
Boatbuilders, 66
Boeing of Canada Limited, 63
Boese, August Albert, 72
Boese, Mrs. Frank, 72
Bouvier, Rev. Joseph, 70
Box, Dr. J. Howard, 66
Boyce, Alan, 34
Brackebusch, Rev. G., 75
Brennan, James, 83
Brennan, John, 89
Bridge, Professor Hedley, 32
Brill, John, 2
Brockville & Ottawa Railway, 11
Brooks, R.J., 77
Brown, Captain G., 34
Buchanan Mills, 2, 5, 11
Buchanan, Andrew, 2
Buchanan, George, 2
Budd, E.J., 91
Bullard, Bill, 32
Burnette, Thomas, (photo)87
Burwash, Armon, 2, 21, 30
Burwash, Arthur, 91
Burwash, Edgar Harrington, 32, 42, (photo)43
Burwash, John H., 33, 89
Burwash, Mrs. Nathaniel, 21
Burwash, Sid, 91
Butter Tub Factory, 66
Byrne, Daniel, 89
Byrne, John R., 89
Caillier, Oscar, 81
Calcutron Corporation, 65
Calvery Baptist Church, 77
Cambell, John, 5
Camboose shanty, 12-13, (photos)13, 14
Cameron Hotel, 80
Cameron, Mae Savoie, (photo)115
Campbell House Hotel, 80
Campbell, A.F. & Son, 66 See also Chronicle, Feb. 1, 1945, page 3: story of A.F. Campbell: “From three piles of lumber to successful retail business”; pictures.
Campbell, Archibald, 82
Campbell, Archie, 80
Campbell building, (photo)108
Campbell House Hotel, 80, [photo, 1906] 106
Campbell, George, 89
Campbell, N. Alan, 30, (photo)44
Canadian Legion, 83-84 see also Chronicle, May 30, 1930, page 1: article on Legion
Canadian Public Booth, 66
Carpenter, Tom, 21
Carss Shingle Mill, 66
Carss, William, 10
Cartwright, Lloyd, 83
Caruso Block, 80
Casino Theatre, 82, see article Chronicle Mar. 14, 1930, page 1
Central Hotel, 116
Chaine, Rev. J. Alphonse M., 32, 54, 70
Chambers, Rev. G.A., 75
Charbonneau, Baptiste, (photo)7
Chartier, Captain, 35
Chase Nuclear Canada Limited, 65
Chats Lake Fish & Game Protection Association, 90
Chats Lake, 1, 2, 4, 90
Christiansen, E.B., 79
Churches, 5, 70-78
Circus parade [photo] 127
Clamon, A.D., 65
Clancy Drug Store, (photo) 134
Cleroux, Fred, 65
Cliff, Rev. H.W., 83
Closs, Alex, 86
Conley, D.H., 84
Conners, William, 84
Conroy Brothers, 28
Conservation clubs, 90
Consolidated Bathurst, 64
Cooney, Frank, 33
Cooney, John, 33
Cooney, Percival J. 33
Cotie, Captain Clifton “Kip”, 34, 86
Cotie, Tom, 44
Cousineau, Napolean, 84
Cowley, Captain Daniel K., 4, 33, 34
CPR Station [photo] 112
Craig, David & Son, 66
Craig, George, 10, 89
Craig, W. Barclay, 66, 67
Cram family, 76
Cranston, Dr. James G., 52, 82, 91
Cranston, Hugh, 92
Cranston, Monte, 55, 92
Crown Lands Office, 81
Cunningham, D.K., 80
Cunningham, Jean Macnamara, 33
Cunningham, John, 81
Cunningham, Samuel, 84
Curling, 90-91
Dagenais Hotel, (photo)116
Dagenais, Walter, 48
Davies, William, 84
Daze, Robert, 55
Del Prado Hotel, 80
Dennison, John, 21
Denroche, Rev. C.T., 73
deRenzy, 50
Deschenes, Capt. Joe, 34, 35
Desormia, Joseph, 8, 32
Deutsche Post German newspaper, 79
Diamond Park Springs, 79
Didak Manufacturing Limited, 65
Diener, Edward, (photo) 7
Diener family, 74
Dillabough, Albert, 91
Dillon, Monsignor R.E., 55
Distances, Arnprior, 88
Dochart Brick & Tile Works, 64
Dochart Clay Products, 65
Dochart Creek, 1
Dodd, Henry, 51
Dodd, Tom, 91
Dontigny and Andrew Houghton mill, 49, 65
Dontigny, Charles, P., 83
Dontigny, J.P., 81
Dontigny, Phillip Jr., 81
Dontigny, Phillip, 49, 65
Dore, Tom, 39
Doswell, A.H., 10, 50
Dower rights, 6
Duemmel family, 74
Dulmage, Richard [photo of residence] 97
Dunn, Walter, 48
Edgewood Estate, 33, 43, 49, (photo)128
Egan, John, 4
Elgin St., post office [photo] 127
Elgin Street Baptist Church, (photo)76
Emmanuel Anglican Church, (photo)73
Family Theatre, 81
Farley, 5
Farmer Brothers Bootmakers, (photo)48
Farmer family, 76
Farmer, Edwin, 84
Findley, Dr. John S., 90
Findley, John, 90
Fire fighting, 84-87, [photo] 99
Firm, Cecilia, 49
First Baptist Church, (photo)74
Fleming, Capt., 35
Fleming, Robert, 82
“Flirt” houseboat, 39
Forbes, John, 52
Frappier, Hector, 83
Fraser, George, 8
Fraser, James, 75
French Canadians, 21
Frezell, Mae (Mrs. Norman McLachlin), 38
Fulton, Andrew, 32, 52
Fulton, Harvey, 52
Gadbois, James, 84
Galetta Electric Power Corporation, 44, 51
Gallipeau, Bob, 50
Galvin, J.P., 84 see article in Watchman, Feb. 22, 1918, page 1: photo and obituary of Michael Galvin
Galvin’s Tailor Shop, 81
Gardner, H.W.W., 50
Gardner, P.H., 83
Garrick, Patrick, 85
Gazley, George, 83
German Baptist Church, 76
German settlement, 79
Gillespie, John (“Barney”), 54
Gillies Building, see Post Office
Gillies mills, 64
Gillies, David A., 17, 67
Gillies, John, 64
Goodwin, David, 5, 50
Goodwin’s Bay, [photo] 136
Gormley, Liguori, 48
Gormley, Mrs. Olive(Dontigny), 49
Gospel Hall, (photo)77
Grace St. Andrews United Church, 72, (photo) 73
Graham, Anne, 55
Graham, George L., 16, 35, 39
Graham, Jimmy, (photo)46
Graham, M.D., 84
Graham, Mary, 50
Grand Union Hotel, 81 see also: Chronicle, July 24, 1930, page 3
Grant, Capt. William, 33
Great War Veteran’s Association, 83
Green, Cletus, 86
Green, J.J.(“Joe”), 92
Green, Phil, 86
Gregory, Isaac, 50
Greneir, Arthur, 23, (photo)46
Greneir, Eugene, (photo)7, 23
Grierson family, 76
Griffith & McNaughton building, 59
Griffith, Jim, 59
Grist mill, 2, 5, (photo)121
Grocery stores, [photos] 108, 114-15
Grout, Trevor H., 44
Grove Nursing Home, 67, (photo) 68
Groves, Johnny, 39
Guadette, Joseph, 28
Gualt, Morley A., 50
Gutzman, Bill, 85
Hachey, Mrs. Leah (Gagnon), (photo)46
Hallman, Rev. Orlando G., 72
Hammond, W.J., 84
Hardinge, R.W., 8
Harness racing, 89
Harrington, Eric, 5, 10, 74, 75, 89
Harrington Street, [photo] 120
Hartney, James, 3, 21
Hartney Hotel, (photo)23
Harvey, John L., 84
Havey, James, 5, 10, 28
Havey, Micheal, 51
Havey, Thomas, 8, 79
Hicks, Henry, 84
High School see photo, Chronicle July 2, 1969, page 2 (Grade 10 class, about 1924, with most names)
Old Boys Reunion 1909 [photo] 102
Hill, The [photo] 96
Hinks, Sir Francis, 3, 5
Hockey, 87-88, photos 98, 137
Hodgins, David, 66
Hood, Archie, 91
Hornidge, Charles, (photo) 49
Hospital, 66 ff
Hotels, 21, 80-81, (photo) 116
Houston, Judge Edward, 55, 92
Hubbell’s Falls, 4
Hunt, R.A., 84, 91
Huyck Canada Ltd., 59
Hybernetics Ltd., 65
Incorporation, Arnprior [village], 10
Industries, 59 - 66
Isolation Systems Ltd., 65
Jackson, Robert apt. bldg, formerly Dulmage resid. [photo] 97
Jahnke family, 74
Jefferey, A.J., 79
Jeffery, R.A., 42, 79
Jehovah’s Witness congregation, 78
Jennings, Syd, 82
Johnson, George, 32, 34, 38
Johnston, A.L., 81
Johnston, Hiram, 84, 91
Johnston, W.J., 91
John Street,
1906 [photo] 106
c. 1910 [photo], 119
paving 1915 [photos] 110, 131
1917 [photo] 127
Jordan, Herb, 82
KAO — see Didak
Kelly, Simon, 16
Kennedy, L.J., 81
Kennell Lodge, 1
Kenwood band, 83
Kenwood Mills, 59, [photo of homes] 120
Kerr family, 76 see Chronicle, Dec. 27, 1929, p. 2: article re monument to D.L. Kerr, at Town Hall (1914)
see also Chronicle of Dec. 25, 1914, p. 8 re monument to Kerr (a drowned boy). This monument now at Albert Street cemetery at the foot of the boy’s grave.
Kerr, Charles, 16
Kerr, Frank, 83
Kerr, Rev. E.J., 61
Kierman, Monsignor J.T., 55
King Edward Hotel, 81
Kingdom Hall, (photo)78
Kittner, Paul (photo) 13, 18
Kittner’s Barber Shop, 81
Lacombe, Capt. Eugene, 34
Lacrosse, photo 138
Ladies Aid society, 77
Lampole, Bill, 21, (photo)22
Lang, Dr. R.W., 32
Lapierre family, 30, 34
Lapierre, Louis, 30
Lavoie, Leo, 95
Lavoie, Napoleon, 45
Lee, John D. 84
Lindsay, Mrs. Myra, 54
Liquor laws, 21
Logging
Log boo,. 125
Log marks, 21
Logging, (photos)19, 20, 22, 123-25
Lodge, Guli, 81 (Re William Lodge: Watchman, Mar. 31, 1916, page 1 —
Sub-Lieutenant, age 20, became a flier ...)
Loney, Capt., 34
Lumber camp life, 13
Lumsden, John, 81
Lyon, Donald, 54
Lyon, R., 5
Lyons Hotel, 80
Macnamara, Charles, 7, 38, 48
Macnamara, Richard, 7, 33, 34
Madawaska Hotel, 116
Madawaska River, 2, 3
Mallette, Henry, (photo)7
Malloch & Adams Sash & Door factory, 66
Malloch Saw Mill, 66, (photo)122
Malloch, George, 66
Malloch, Ian G., 50. 84
Mann, Dr. Alexander, 71
Mansfeild, 79
Mansfield Baseball Club, (photo)109
Marble Works & quarry [photos] 97
Mason, Allan, 8
Mathewson Furniture (photo), 134
Mayfair dance pavillion, 47
McComb, Dave, 31
McConnell bothers, 5
McCormick, James, 8
McCormick, T, grocery store [photo] 108
McCowan, Jean, 50
McCoy, John, 18
McCreary, R.B., 51, 84, 91
McDonald family, 76
McDougall, Joseph, 82, 84, 89
McElligott, Thomas W., 83, 90
McFarlane, W.H., 78
McGonigal, Hugh, 5
McGonigal, Peter, 82
McGregor’s Hotel, 81
McKay family, 64, 66
McKerracher, J.H. & Son, Horse Milliners, (photo 1906)104
McLachlin boom camp, (photo)40
McLachlin Bros. business office, (photo)38
McLachlin family, 4, 23, 30, 38 - 41
McLachlin residences, 5, 6, 32, 39 [photos] 97
McLachlin, Daniel Jr., 89
McLachlin, Daniel Sr., 2, 3, (photos) 4, 96
McLachlin, Hugh, 18
McLachlin, J.H., 89
McLachlin, Kenneth, 4, 18
McLachlin, Maria (Harrington), 12
McLachlin Mills,
Grist mill [photos] 96, 121
Grounds and mill site [photo], 117
Map, 130
No. 1 and 2 sawmills [photo] 96
No. 3 sawmill [photo], 129
Turntable flat-car [photo], 118
McLachlin, Mrs. H.F., 90
McLachlin, Mrs. Norman (Frezell), 38
McLean & Mallock Feed Mill, 66
McLean, Judge A.A., 88
McLean, Rev. D.J., 71
McLellan, Neil, 28
McNab family, 76
McNab, Archibald, 1 ff.
McNab, Township, 79
McNamara, Daniel, 5
McNaughton, Norman Lewis, 59
McNeil, Bill, 86
McNeil, Willard, 83
McPhee House, 80-81
Medical Centre, 69
Menzies, A., 84
Menzies, Alex, 91
Merrick Boat Factory, 66, 90
Miller, Alexander, 2
Miskelly, James — not in Leo’s book, but see Chronicle, Nov. 6, 1930, page 2 re a monument to “the late James Miskelly”
Mississippi River, 4
Moffatt, Capt. Jack, 34
Moir, J.S., Hardware & Plumbing, (photo)103
Moir, J.S., Sporting Goods, Automob. (photo)107
Moles, G.H., 44
Moles, R.G., 82 see article in Chronicle, Aug. 14, 1930, page 2 (40 years ago)
Mooney, Jack, (photo)116
Moore family, 76
Morris Island, 2
Morris, Vern M., 50
Moskos Block, 80
Moskos Confectionary, (photo) 101, see article Chronicle Mar. 14, 1930, page 1 (building)
Moskos, Joseph and Evangeline, 49
Mulvihill, Cornelius Anthony, 44, 55, 66
Mulvihill, John, 30
Mulvihill, Micheal, 26 see also Chronicle, Dec. 4, 1930, p. 8 “Outstanding ...”
Mulvihill, Timothy C., 26
Munn & MacDonald, 78
Murphy, James, p. (photo) 138
Munroe, James Sr., 44
Murphy, Annie, (photo)115
Murphy, Edward J. (photo, p. 29, “The Shippers”, sitting on stacks)
Murphy, Jack, 55
Murphy, Joe, 91, (photo of grocery store)115
Murphy, John, 31
Murphy, John E. (photo, p. 29, “The Shippers”, white hat, foreground)
Murphy, Ollie, 30
Nadeau, Everiste, 18
Needham, Henry, 41
Neill, Bob, 84
Neilson, George E., 82
Nesbit, (“Doc”), 89
New Byrne Hotel, 80
Nettleton, W.A., 91
Newspapers, 42, 78-79
Nickolson, J.H., 78
Nickolson, James, 32
Nieman family, 74
Nieman, Edward, 48
Nor-Sand Metal Incorporated, 62
“Norvic - Ottawa” ferry boat, 35, 44
O’Brien Theatre, 82
Old Boys Reunion, 1909 [photo] 102
Old Orchard Estate, formerly sawmill site, [photo] 122
O’Neill House Hotel, 81
Opeongo Road, 23
Osborne, E.D. & Son, 80
Osborne, Mrs. Edith, 79
Ottawa Valley Amusement Company, 82
Owens, Rev. Brynle, 77
Parnell, Richie Hannah, 7
Parsons family, 76
Parsons, George, 52
Payette’s Motel, 18
Payne, Tom, 52
Pell, Charlie, 17
Pelltier, Pierre, 18
Penticostal Church, (photo)75
Pettigrew, Gary, 54
Pfifzer Canada Inc., 63
Phillips, John S., 81
Phillips, Sandy, 91
Piasecki Helicopter Corporation, 63
Picard, Capt. J., 34
Playtex Limited, 65
Pointer boat, 23, (photo)16
Post Offices, 5
[photo, Gillies Bldg. 1906] 106, 111
[photo, Elgin St.] 127
Pouliot, Joseph, 44, (photo)45
Powell, Bob, 18
Powell, Charlie W., 52
[Note: Chronicle of Aug. 17, 1944 front page, has an article about Charles W. Powell selling “the oldest business stand in town, known as ‘William Russell Corner’.]
Prensler, Steve, 79
Prensler, William, 84
Prensler, Blanch (“Bud”), 79
Prince of Wales visit, 7
Pye, A.C., 91
Railways, 11-12, 18
Railway Station, CPR [photo] 112
Redtmann family, 74
Reid, Alexander, 54
Reid, Dr. A.H., 66
Richards, Capt. William, 3
Riddell, Robert, 52
Robinson family, 76
Robinson, Tom, 48
Rogers, Ella Gillan, 55
Rowe, John (photo), 7
Rowing, 90
Royal Canadian Legion (Branch no. 174), 83
Royal visit 1860, 7, [photo stage coach], 121
Rudd, Stafford R., 44 [see also article in Chronicle, Sep. 11, 1930, p. 3]
Runtz family, 74
Runtz, John, 75
Russell, Andrew & Son Ltd., 5, 50
Sacred Heart Convent [photo] 96
St. Andrew’s Presbyterian church, (photo)71
St. Clair Jeans, Rev. Dr. C.J., 71
St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, 75
St. John Chrysostom R. C. Church, 70, (photos) 75-76, 113, 125-6
St. Jules, Severe, (photo) 7
St. Thomas Anglican Church, Woodlawn, (photo) 60
Salck, H.L., 89
Salvador, Peter, 27
Sanitaris Limited, 80
Sash & Door Company, 66
Saw mills, 2, 5, 23, (photos) 24-25, 122, 129, 130
Schlacter family, 74
Schmidt, Rev. Walter, 74
Schools, 54, 56, (photos) 57-59, 119
Service clubs, 92
Settlers, 1, 5
Shanties, 12-21
Shaw, Fred, 32
Shea, Edward, 66
Sheffied, Jean, 76
Shoppers Guide, 79
Simpson, Albert, 91
Simpson, Joe, 91
Simpson, Mabel McKay, 66
Simpson, R.J., 66
Simpson, Robert M., 66
Slater, Eric, 91
Slater, Len, 85
Smith’s Construction Co., 61 [Smith Construction, Smiths]
Smith family, 61
Smith, Norman, 85
Sorting table [lumber mill], 27
Sports, 88 ff.
Square D Electical Equipment Inc., 63
Square timber operation, 26
Star and the Arnprior Weekly Review newspaper, 78
Staye, Alex, 8, 46, (photo)47
Staye, Jack, 85
Steamboats, see also Tugboats
“Alliance”, 34
“Amable du Fort”, 34
“Baldwin”, 34
“Bonnechere”, 34, (photo)124
“Chaperone”, 39
“Emerald”, 3, 4, 7
“George Buchanan”, 4, 33
“Hamilton”, 34
“Hiram Robinson”, 46, (photo)123
“J.L. Murphy”, 34
“Janet Craig”, 34
“Norway Belle”, 35
“Opeongo”, 34, 39, (photo)123
“Oregon”, 34, (photo)35, 39
“Pontiac”, 34
“Prince Arthur”, 34
“Madawaska”, 34, (photo)124
“Samson”,, 34
“White Bear”, 34
“William Douglas”, 34
Steen’s Landing, 4
Stewart, (“Chain Lightning”), 28
Streich family, 74
Strobel, Rev. Francis L., 74
Styles, George, 30
Styles Bakery, (photo) 135
Sugar Bowl Candy Kitchen, 50
Sullivan, Francis C., Ottawa architect, 80
Sullivan, M.& Son Construction Co., 60
Sullivan, Maurice, 60
Sullivan, Mort, 81
Sullivan, Murtagh, 81
Surtees, Roberty, 60
Sutherland, George, 8
Tait, Peter, 23
Tanuay, Les, 34
Theatorium, 81
Theatres, 81
Thomas Toy Axe Factory, 66
Thomson, W.N., 65
Tierney, John, 82
Tierny, J.R., 91
Tierny, J.W.C., (“Cloud”), 92
Timber duty, 2
Toner, Capt. Philip, 34
Tourangeau, Henry, (photo) 86
Tourangeau, Stanley, (photo) 86
Toy, Thomas, 10
Tripp, druggist, (photo) 134
Tugboats, see also Steamboats
“Donald McDonald”, 34, (photos) 34, 132
“Jean Macnamara”, 34 (photos) 35, 133
“Robinson”, 34, 39
Tweedsmuir, Lady, 90
Union Forwarding & Railway Company, 3, 34
Union Village, 3
Upper Ottawa Improvement Company, 17, 34
Usborne & Company, 8
Usborne, Henry, 64
Usborne, Jack, 33
Valin, George, 91
Valin, William, 91
Valkenaar, Rev. J.J., 74
Vermette, Alphonse, 90
Vermette, John, 8
Victoria Fire Company, 84
Village Hall, 82
Waba Lodge, 2
Wallace, James, 81
Warrock, Monsignor J.T., 55
Watson, John, 52
Wesleyan Church, (photo)72
Whitelaw (J.K.) Grocery, 44
Whitelaw, R.J., 5
Whyte, James, 91
Whyte, Mrs. J. Lorne, (photo in store) 114
Williams, J.C., 79
Wilson & Hartney [The Arcade] [photo] 97
Wilson, Sister Nancy, 55
Woermke, Emile, 66
Woermke, Herman, 66
Wolfe family, 41
Wolfe, Ernest B., 41, (photo)42, 83
Women’s groups, 74, 77, 84
Wood, Nora Ward, 90
Young, Eva, 81
Yuill, Tom, 18
Yuill, Alex, 42
Zadow, Walter A., 52
Notes
Items of interest prepared by Peter Hessel, 2002.
Accession No.
9999-9999
Less detail
Date
1839
Collection/Fonds
William K. Hamilton Fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
scanned photograph
  1 image  
Date
1839
Format
photographic
Collection/Fonds
William K. Hamilton Fonds
Description Level
Item
Reproduction Location
work room
Creator
N. MacDougall
Physical Description
scanned photograph
Language
English
Acquisition Source
Image provided by Bill Hamilton in October 2011. The picture was discovered by Shona Garner in 2006 in an Entertainment House in Glasgow Scotland. Shona seems to have been in contact with Nancy Cardozier of Texas and a cousin in Ottawa. After 6 months of correspondence, Nancy was able to procure a copy. Bill Hamilton has the photo framed as part of a collage of photos and life history of James Airth.
Scope and Content
The only man named in the picture is blind James Airth playing the violin. James was born in 1800 and was blind from childhood. He was able to make a living and provide for his wife and seven children by going from town to town playing the violin on the stage. At that time there was no social assistance.
After his wife died, he came to Canada in 1849 with 3 of his children.
The inscription at the bottom right hand corner of the image is `N. MacDougall 1839`
Accruals
Accruals are expected.
Related Material
See also Cordozier books, part of the Peter Hessel Collection - 2 books on the Family History of Peter Fyfe and Ellen Hamilton - stored with family histories in the reading room
Accession No.
2011-0255
Images
Less detail
Date
1825-1850
Collection/Fonds
William K. Hamilton Fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
scanned photograph
  1 image  
Date
1825-1850
Format
photographic
Collection/Fonds
William K. Hamilton Fonds
Description Level
Item
Reproduction Location
work room
Physical Description
scanned photograph
Language
English
Acquisition Source
Image provided by Bill Hamilton in October 2011. He has the photo framed as part of a collage of photos and life history of James Airth.
Scope and Content
The photo is of a brass plaque stating `James Airth Musician`. It was on the trunk of James Airth which carried his belongings and violins to his next engagement. As of 2011, the old trunk is still in the possession of a descendant of James.
Accruals
Accruals are expected.
Related Material
See also Cordozier books, part of the Peter Hessel Collection - 2 books on the Family History of Peter Fyfe and Ellen Hamilton - stored with family histories in the reading room
Accession No.
2011-0255
Images
Less detail

Receipt from Wm. Sharples for sale of two rafts of white pine timber

https://search.adarchives.org/en/permalink/archivaldescr5231
Date
6 July 1836
Collection/Fonds
McLachlin Bros. fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mm textual records
  1 document  
Date
6 July 1836
Format
textual records
Collection/Fonds
McLachlin Bros. fonds
Description Level
Item
Series
F209
Physical Description
1 mm textual records
Scope and Content
A sale account for the purchase of two rafts of white pine timber.
Notes
Envelope 1
Access Restriction
Use digital copy only. Archivist's permission required to access original.
Accession No.
2003-0164
Documents

2003-0164_MU1957_1836_CorFromWmSharples.pdf

View PDF
Less detail

Receipt from Wm. Sharples for sale of a raft of white pine timber

https://search.adarchives.org/en/permalink/archivaldescr5232
Date
7 August 1837
Collection/Fonds
McLachlin Bros. fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mm textual records
  1 document  
Date
7 August 1837
Format
textual records
Collection/Fonds
McLachlin Bros. fonds
Description Level
Item
Series
F209
Physical Description
1 mm textual records
Scope and Content
A sale account for a raft of white pine timber.
Notes
Envelope 1
Access Restriction
Use digital copy only. Archivist's permission required to access original.
Accession No.
2003-0164
Documents

2003-0164_MU1957_1837_CorFromWmSharples.pdf

View PDF
Less detail

Agreement of William Sharples with Daniel & Wm. McLachlin regarding timber sales

https://search.adarchives.org/en/permalink/archivaldescr5473
Date
17 October 1837
Collection/Fonds
McLachlin Bros. fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mm textual records
  1 document  
Date
17 October 1837
Format
textual records
Collection/Fonds
McLachlin Bros. fonds
Description Level
Item
Series
F209
Physical Description
1 mm textual records
Scope and Content
The memorandum of an agreement between Sharples and the McLachlins wherein the latter provide white pine timber rafts to the former for monetary compensation.
Notes
Envelope 1
Access Restriction
Use digital copy only. Archivist's permission required to access original.
Accession No.
2003-0164
Documents

2003-0164_MU1957_1837_CorFromDanielandWmMcLachlin.pdf

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Less detail

Agreement of William Sharples with Daniel & Wm. McLachlin regarding timber sales

https://search.adarchives.org/en/permalink/archivaldescr5474
Date
8 October 1836
Collection/Fonds
McLachlin Bros. fonds
Description Level
Item
Physical Description
1 mm textual records
  1 document  
Date
8 October 1836
Format
textual records
Collection/Fonds
McLachlin Bros. fonds
Description Level
Item
Series
F209
Physical Description
1 mm textual records
Scope and Content
The memorandum of an agreement between Sharples and the McLachlins wherein the latter was to provide 50,000 cubic feet of white pine timber for monetary compensation.
Notes
Envelope 1
Access Restriction
Use digital copy only. Archivist's permission required to access original.
Accession No.
2003-0164
Documents

2003-0164_MU1957_1836_CorFromDanielandWmMcLachlin.pdf

View PDF
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 1.